Header image
Enter a name
Lateral view of a Male Baetis (Baetidae) (Blue-Winged Olive) Mayfly Dun from Mystery Creek #43 in New York
Blue-winged Olives
Baetis

Tiny Baetis mayflies are perhaps the most commonly encountered and imitated by anglers on all American trout streams due to their great abundance, widespread distribution, and trout-friendly emergence habits.

Dorsal view of a Holocentropus (Polycentropodidae) Caddisfly Larva from the Yakima River in Washington
This one seems to tentatively key to Holocentropus, although I can't make out the anal spines in Couplet 7 of the Key to Genera of Polycentropodidae Larvae nor the dark bands in Couplet 4 of the Key to Genera of Polycentropodidae Larvae, making me wonder if I went wrong somewhere in keying it out. I don't see where that could have happened, though. It might also be that it's a very immature larva and doesn't possess all the identifying characteristics in the key yet. If Holocentropus is correct, then Holocentropus flavus and Holocentropus interruptus are the two likely possibilities based on range, but I was not able to find a description of their larvae.
27" brown trout, my largest ever. It was the sub-dominant fish in its pool. After this, I hooked the bigger one, but I couldn't land it.
Troutnut is a project started in 2003 by salmonid ecologist Jason "Troutnut" Neuswanger to help anglers and fly tyers unabashedly embrace the entomological side of the sport. Learn more about Troutnut or support the project for an enhanced experience here.

Drifter21
Washington

Posts: 2
Drifter21 on Mar 29, 2013March 29th, 2013, 7:04 pm EDT
Hey guys,

I have a sage Launch 5wt with a C2 Ross Reel
and a Sage Vantage 4wt

I am struggling to decide what fly lines to buy, I have heard that if you use a 5wt to buy a 6wt line as it loads better with the Sage Launch, I haven't tested this yet as Rio Grand Fly lines are already 1/2 size bigger than "Standard".

I may buy a sage 1650 reel for my 4wt and load it with a 4wt floating line and a 5wt intermediate sinking line for small ponds / lakes.
Sayfu
Posts: 560
Sayfu on Mar 29, 2013March 29th, 2013, 7:45 pm EDT

I'd hopefully get a chance to cast the different line wts. to see what casts best. For one, you need to determine what distance you fish at most of the time. If you are constantly throwing long distance then I'd guess the line wt. suggested would be the best. If a much shorter distance, and the need to load the rod with a much shorter line out past the rod tip, then maybe one line wt. up is best. When I buy a 5wt. I want to match it with a 5wt. because I am thinking how it lands on the water when fishing dries. It also depends on ones casting stroke. If you are an aggressive caster, and move the rod fast, and double haul as well you are flexing the rod besides the wt. of the line. I don't do that anymore. I want the rod to do the work. And I often fish DT lines which adds a little wt. if you have more than the front taper out past the rod tip. But the rod action greatly determines the how much wt. out past the rod tip is needed to load the rod. If the rod is a medium action 5wt. I doubt you would want to use a 6 wt. line on it...maybe if it is a fast action rod. Hope a little bit of this makes sense.
Drifter21
Washington

Posts: 2
Drifter21 on Mar 30, 2013March 30th, 2013, 1:14 pm EDT
With my 5 wt I throw medium to long distance. I used a 4wt line on it just lawn casting and I did little to no work with tossing the line, the lines I was using however are garbage that came with the reels I had purchased. The 4 weight I use on rivers, lakes, and small streams and cast out very short to medium range. Currently I just need to toy with my casting more to see what works with me. I don't double haul and I doubt I ever will. The 5 weight I use on bigger rivers and scenarios where the weather isn't taking the 4 wt or can't reach as far as I'd like.

My main concern is the fly lines I really am at a loss for what is seen as good or what is seen as the "excessive" the scientific angler lines look good and the intermediate 5wt line I have for lake fishing is alright. I think I need to put the 5 wt on the reel and play with it on both rods. I know that rio grand fly lines are made 1/2 size bigger than standard, but that's all I know in the fly line department other than up keep.
Sayfu
Posts: 560
Sayfu on Mar 30, 2013March 30th, 2013, 1:21 pm EDT
Oh, you will double haul if you get to fly fishing a lot. It becomes part of the rhythm of casting, and takes the work load of your casting arm. Half the effort can then be done by the off arm. Doesn't have to be a big, long pull
, just a short tug, but a big asset to casting a fly..helps in windy conditions to create line speed..I won't leave home without mine.
Adirman
Adirman's profile picture
Monticello, NY

Posts: 479
Adirman on Apr 2, 2013April 2nd, 2013, 2:10 pm EDT
I agree w Sayfu Drifter in that if you flyfish enough, you'll sort of naturally progress into it. Trust me, took me about 5 good seasons till I "got it" and itll probably take me another 5 to perfect it too!
Davion
Canada

Posts: 1
Davion on Apr 3, 2014April 3rd, 2014, 1:16 am EDT
Hi, thank you for your great post. .It is interesting and helpful. Good luck with it!!! Check out here for fishing fly in
flyin fishing canada
TKB
TKB's profile picture
Pennsylvania

Posts: 24
TKB on Mar 29, 2015March 29th, 2015, 7:33 am EDT
Looking for advice on a new line. I have not bought a new fly line in several years - OK, 8 years. It is time to replace the line I use with my circa 1990 Sage LL 9' 5wt. I love this rod but only use it when I am throwing dries these days. I've looked at the Rio and SA products and am totally confused about the new textures, tapers etc.

I moved over to WF lines about two decades ago but am considering DT for this set up going forward. Thoughts?
Wbranch
Wbranch's profile picture
York & Starlight PA

Posts: 2635
Wbranch on Mar 29, 2015March 29th, 2015, 7:45 am EDT
Hello TKB,

I have two LL rods, a 9' #4 and a 8' 9" #4. I used to use a DT#4 on the 9' rod but in my opinion modern WF lines now can lay down a pretty gentle cast with a weight forward line. I still use a DT#3 on the 8' 9" rod. I believe most of the name brand line makers produce good lines. I like Rio, Cortland and Orvis although I don't know who makes the Orvis lines. I line the Orvis Hydro line with the pebble finish and it does shoot well and slide through the guides smoothly. But if you aren't going to be throwing further than 40' I would stay with the more conventional smooth finish lines. There are many variants of the floating line today and you will just have to see which one suits your needs the best.
Catskill fly fisher for fifty-five years.
MiltRPowell
Posts: 106
MiltRPowell on Mar 29, 2015March 29th, 2015, 10:28 am EDT
Hi TKB,
Well, ya could always go with Cortland. Still making the 333,& what I like the 444 peach. I also fish DT lines, 4&5DT. Cort, lines are from 2-9 wts. Lasting durability, have not seen any better, but that's just me. There are a great bunch of lines for sale. But price wise, there are good deals, if ya look around.
But I find the 444 supple & fast threw the eyes of my rods, great floating & more.
My buddy is trying Rio trout light Touch Double Taper line on his 6'6" rod this year. Looks nice, I casted it, casts nice. For snow casting in the yard yesterday. We'll see soon.
Well luck to ya, line hunting can be taxing on a guy. They make alot stuff out there, & they all want you ta buy there new line products.:) $$$-$$$-$$$.
flyfishingthecreekM.R.P.
PaulRoberts
PaulRoberts's profile picture
Colorado

Posts: 1776
PaulRoberts on Mar 29, 2015March 29th, 2015, 5:15 pm EDT
Looking for advice on a new line. I have not bought a new fly line in several years - OK, 8 years. It is time to replace the line I use with my circa 1990 Sage LL 9' 5wt. I love this rod but only use it when I am throwing dries these days. I've looked at the Rio and SA products and am totally confused about the new textures, tapers etc.

I moved over to WF lines about two decades ago but am considering DT for this set up going forward. Thoughts?

I like a DT simply bc in most stream trout fishing casts are close and being able to turn it around after the one end wears out is a great advantage. Little cracks and fractures end up sinking the end of a fly line over time. Also, a DT will roll-cast and mend a long way out if need be.

Agree that there are lots of good lines out there by all manufacturers. I've used some inexpensive lines too -one rod I have here I bought a cheap SI entry level line ($15) for SW travel fishing (in case I lose it to airlines or theft) and have found it a slick casting line, although I can't speak for it's durability. Lines do wear out and cheap lines tend to go quickest.

As to finishes, although I'm not up on the latest, one of the greatest advances made in fly-lines has been the slick surfaces and some rigidity in the body that allows the line to pass the guides quickly and smoothly. A number of years ago I picked up a Cortland 333 line to save a few bucks and found it impossibly soft. It just hung in the guides making line management more than difficult. That was the original 333 formula and I don't know if it has been changed since. Take home is to avoid too soft a line. I've liked all the other Cortland lines I've tried, as well as SI, Wulff, and Air-Flo.

Quick Reply

Related Discussions

Topic
Replies
Last Reply
2
Sep 21, 2018
by Lltdeer
Troutnut.com is copyright © 2004-2024 (email Jason). privacy policy