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Lateral view of a Male Baetis (Baetidae) (Blue-Winged Olive) Mayfly Dun from Mystery Creek #43 in New York
Blue-winged Olives
Baetis

Tiny Baetis mayflies are perhaps the most commonly encountered and imitated by anglers on all American trout streams due to their great abundance, widespread distribution, and trout-friendly emergence habits.

Ventral view of a Hydropsyche (Hydropsychidae) (Spotted Sedge) Caddisfly Larva from the Yakima River in Washington
With a bit of help from the microscope, this specimen keys clearly and unsurprisingly to Hydropsyche.
27" brown trout, my largest ever. It was the sub-dominant fish in its pool. After this, I hooked the bigger one, but I couldn't land it.
Troutnut is a project started in 2003 by salmonid ecologist Jason "Troutnut" Neuswanger to help anglers and fly tyers unabashedly embrace the entomological side of the sport. Learn more about Troutnut or support the project for an enhanced experience here.

Crepuscular
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Boiling Springs, PA

Posts: 920
Crepuscular on Mar 5, 2013March 5th, 2013, 9:24 am EST
Another from today
Entoman
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Northern CA & ID

Posts: 2604
Entoman on Mar 5, 2013March 5th, 2013, 9:32 am EST
What do you think?

"It's not that I find fishing so important, it's just that I find all other endeavors of Man equally unimportant... And not nearly as much fun!" Robert Traver, Anatomy of a Fisherman
Crepuscular
Crepuscular's profile picture
Boiling Springs, PA

Posts: 920
Crepuscular on Mar 5, 2013March 5th, 2013, 9:55 am EST
I think I should not have bothered posting my photo. You already know what they look like. :)
Entoman
Entoman's profile picture
Northern CA & ID

Posts: 2604
Entoman on Mar 5, 2013March 5th, 2013, 10:55 am EST
:)
"It's not that I find fishing so important, it's just that I find all other endeavors of Man equally unimportant... And not nearly as much fun!" Robert Traver, Anatomy of a Fisherman
Oldredbarn
Oldredbarn's profile picture
Novi, MI

Posts: 2600
Oldredbarn on Mar 5, 2013March 5th, 2013, 11:21 am EST
Kurt...I'll take a dozen...;)

Is that wrapped partridge?

What size? Both of you...:)
"Even when my best efforts fail it's a satisfying challenge, and that, after all, is the essence of fly fishing." -Chauncy Lively

"Envy not the man who lives beside the river, but the man the river flows through." Joseph T Heywood
Crepuscular
Crepuscular's profile picture
Boiling Springs, PA

Posts: 920
Crepuscular on Mar 5, 2013March 5th, 2013, 12:53 pm EST
They come in all sizes from as small as you want to tie to about a 14 scud hook. This one was a size #16.
Entoman
Entoman's profile picture
Northern CA & ID

Posts: 2604
Entoman on Mar 5, 2013March 5th, 2013, 2:33 pm EST
We get 'em out here up to size 8! Most are in the 12 to 16 range. The partridge is spun in a loop, Spence. The hackles are too short and the barbules too long to wrap conventionally. First dub the thread, form a loop, and insert the barbules to the proper length horizontally on the dubbing and twist the loop up enough to trap them. then trim off the stems along the edge of the thread so the barbule bases don't show. Finish twisting up and wrap on the shank over copious quantities of lead. It's a bit tricky to do. I'm thinking of investing in one of those Petitjean tools to simplify and speed things up...

Most aren't speckled like Eric's specimen. They come in all shades of gray, tan, and olive (some greenish yellow or even peachy cream). I pretty much stick with this aqua tinted gray & partridge and a greenish olive version tied with plain hen hackle. For the tannish ones, I just use a Bird's Nest (as I probably would for Eric's). In sizes 12 - 18, they cover the spectrum for 90% of the ones I've ever run into (of which 75% are covered by the olive). Some of the lakes I have fished (particularly in OR) have the big boys. I just trim up a small Crystal Bugger to deal with those if I have to.
"It's not that I find fishing so important, it's just that I find all other endeavors of Man equally unimportant... And not nearly as much fun!" Robert Traver, Anatomy of a Fisherman

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