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Artistic view of a Male Pteronarcys californica (Pteronarcyidae) (Giant Salmonfly) Stonefly Adult from the Gallatin River in Montana
Salmonflies
Pteronarcys californica

The giant Salmonflies of the Western mountains are legendary for their proclivity to elicit consistent dry-fly action and ferocious strikes.

Lateral view of a Onocosmoecus (Limnephilidae) (Great Late-Summer Sedge) Caddisfly Larva from the Yakima River in Washington
This specimen keys pretty easily to Onocosmoecus, and it closely resembles a specimen from Alaska which caddis expert Dave Ruiter recognized as this genus. As with that specimen, the only species in the genus documented in this area is Onocosmoecus unicolor, but Dave suggested for that specimen that there might be multiple not-yet-distinguished species under the unicolor umbrella and it would be best to stick with the genus-level ID. I'm doing the same for this one.
27" brown trout, my largest ever. It was the sub-dominant fish in its pool. After this, I hooked the bigger one, but I couldn't land it.
Troutnut is a project started in 2003 by salmonid ecologist Jason "Troutnut" Neuswanger to help anglers and fly tyers unabashedly embrace the entomological side of the sport. Learn more about Troutnut or support the project for an enhanced experience here.

Noreaster
Posts: 3
Noreaster on Jul 1, 2012July 1st, 2012, 2:41 pm EDT
Hello
I'm new so be gentle. I have a vintage 7'6'' 2 piece Sage Graphite III fly rod and it recommends a #5 line and reel. My question is could I use a 4 weight reel with a 5 weight line and get away with it?

The rod is feather lite and I was hoping to find a really lite reel. The Sage fly reel I wanted to use has a 2 and change oz difference in the weight between the 3/4 and the 5/6 reels. Is this ok or is it bad? I know I would lose backing space but I have never caught a fish where I needed backing. Mostly under 2 pound trout I am fishing.
thank you
Martinlf
Martinlf's profile picture
Moderator
Palmyra PA

Posts: 3047
Martinlf on Jul 1, 2012July 1st, 2012, 4:36 pm EDT
I've seen various opinions from various experts on how a reel should balance on a rod. I think if someone else's rule doesn't matter to you, it doesn't matter. Can you try both on the rod to see how it feels to you? The line should fit on either reel, but you can cut down the back of the line if you need to, or if want a little more backing. It never hurts to have a little just in case. I have had a fish or two take me into the backing; you never know when it might happen. I use gel spun backing (20 or 30 pound test Powerpro fishing line) and it works very well for me. It is very strong, and has a small diameter, but it sits well on the reel and winds on and off smoothly.
"He spread them a yard and a half. 'And every one that got away is this big.'"

--Fred Chappell
Shanti
Sweden

Posts: 95
Shanti on Jul 2, 2012July 2nd, 2012, 2:55 am EDT
Good advice from Martinlf, about the gel spun backing.

I'd say it's important that the reel ain't too light, that will only make your rod feel tip-heavy. And even if I don't care all that much about weight when it comes to gear, I don't want that feeling.
I have a light 7' #3-rod, which I use all sorts of reels on, some of them heavy.

Somewhere, right now, a fish is rising.
And you´re at the computer..
Gutcutter
Gutcutter's profile picture
Pennsylvania

Posts: 470
Gutcutter on Jul 2, 2012July 2nd, 2012, 3:45 pm EDT
I use gel spun backing (20 or 30 pound test Powerpro fishing line) and it works very well for me. It is very strong, and has a small diameter, but it sits well on the reel and winds on and off smoothly.


Be very careful with that stuff. Even a short run into your backing can ruin your trip, and ability to fish.
That will cut you like a razor. Imagine a 1/4 inch deep paper cut.
Been there. I would never recommend it.
Stick with Dacron.
If you have to use it for some reason, pay more attention to your fingers and reel than to the fish.
All men who fish may in turn be divided into two parts: those who fish for trout and those who don't. Trout fishermen are a race apart: they are a dedicated crew- indolent, improvident, and quietly mad.

-Robert Traver, Trout Madness
Noreaster
Posts: 3
Noreaster on Jul 2, 2012July 2nd, 2012, 5:05 pm EDT
Thanks for the advice.
Martinlf
Martinlf's profile picture
Moderator
Palmyra PA

Posts: 3047
Martinlf on Jul 2, 2012July 2nd, 2012, 6:03 pm EDT
Tony, I'll have to beg to differ, with some acknowledgement that handling the stuff without care could conceivably lead to problems. I've been using it for years and have had big fish on the Delaware take me into the backing on a number of occasions. I've never had a problem. Just get the fish on the reel, and you're fine. Plenty of folks do use it. Though I wouldn't in the salt; now that could be dangerous.
"He spread them a yard and a half. 'And every one that got away is this big.'"

--Fred Chappell
Gutcutter
Gutcutter's profile picture
Pennsylvania

Posts: 470
Gutcutter on Jul 2, 2012July 2nd, 2012, 6:15 pm EDT
... and have had big fish on the Delaware take me into the backing on a number of occasions. I've never had a problem. Just get the fish on the reel, and you're fine...

When the fish is in the backing, you're already "on the reel". A trout may take you into your backing, but it doesn't make a fast run, nor fight for a long time.
I'm not doubting that you use it, and use it well, but there really is no use for gelspun backing on a freshwater reel, unless you want to utilize a smaller reel for a larger species on a heavier rod - like an Alaskan Silver on a five weight using a three or four weight reel.
Now with a fresh coho on light line - watch your fingers - even with Dacron.
My point is, that if you want to "take up room" on a reel heavier than your rod (a five weight reel on a three weight rod) Dacron has a larger diameter per yard of line. If you want to use a smaller reel for a heavier rod, then use some Dacron (20 pound) but, it won't be as much line.
You will rarely need to see the backing on a trout reel under normal circumstances.
I was "talked out" of 50 pound gelspun on a tarpon reel after I cut myself on a 2 pound bonefish.
Besides, it was three hundred yards of 30 pound Dacron instead of three fifty of gel spun.
I realized that I never came close to being "spooled" with the Dacron, even on hundred pound plus tarpon.
My two pennies
All men who fish may in turn be divided into two parts: those who fish for trout and those who don't. Trout fishermen are a race apart: they are a dedicated crew- indolent, improvident, and quietly mad.

-Robert Traver, Trout Madness
Martinlf
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Moderator
Palmyra PA

Posts: 3047
Martinlf on Jul 2, 2012July 2nd, 2012, 6:53 pm EDT
I've had a couple of big Main Stem bows peel a lot of backing off, and I like having a good bit for insurance. My Lamson Radius 2 reels simply won't hold the amount I like to have plus fly line if I use dacron. I may have a bit too much, but I know guys who have been spooled on the Main Stem, and I don't want to join their ranks. There are plenty of other ways to lose fish there. :)
"He spread them a yard and a half. 'And every one that got away is this big.'"

--Fred Chappell

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