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Lateral view of a Female Hexagenia limbata (Ephemeridae) (Hex) Mayfly Dun from the Namekagon River in Wisconsin
Hex Mayflies
Hexagenia limbata

The famous nocturnal Hex hatch of the Midwest (and a few other lucky locations) stirs to the surface mythically large brown trout that only touch streamers for the rest of the year.

Dorsal view of a Neoleptophlebia (Leptophlebiidae) Mayfly Nymph from the Yakima River in Washington
Some characteristics from the microscope images for the tentative species id: The postero-lateral projections are found only on segment 9, not segment 8. Based on the key in Jacobus et al. (2014), it appears to key to Neoleptophlebia adoptiva or Neoleptophlebia heteronea, same as this specimen with pretty different abdominal markings. However, distinguishing between those calls for comparing the lengths of the second and third segment of the labial palp, and this one (like the other one) only seems to have two segments. So I'm stuck on them both. It's likely that the fact that they're immature nymphs stymies identification in some important way.
27" brown trout, my largest ever. It was the sub-dominant fish in its pool. After this, I hooked the bigger one, but I couldn't land it.
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John_don04
Northeastern,PA

Posts: 3
John_don04 on Mar 7, 2007March 7th, 2007, 12:56 pm EST
First I would like to say how happy I am that I found this web site ! I am relatively new to the sport & think its a great site!! I was hiking along the Lehigh on 3/4/07 & noticed insects from 1/2" to 1 1/8 inches long crawling on the snow pack.Both were brownish black in color. And unfortunately, I don't have pictures .The smaller size had 2 tails & the latter none.Jason Neuswanger believes,by the info I provided him.That they are Early Brown or Black -Stoneflies.Any additional help would be appreciated!And I need all the help I can get!! One other question. Does anyone have any suggestions on a good Field - Pocket Guide for insect identification for PA ? JWD
JWD
Martinlf
Martinlf's profile picture
Moderator
Palmyra PA

Posts: 3047
Martinlf on Mar 7, 2007March 7th, 2007, 1:22 pm EST
Several people recommended this book for PA bugs; I've found it to be excellent:

Ames book
"He spread them a yard and a half. 'And every one that got away is this big.'"

--Fred Chappell
John_don04
Northeastern,PA

Posts: 3
John_don04 on Mar 14, 2007March 14th, 2007, 12:48 pm EDT
Louis ,
Thank You for the info !! I apoligize for not replying sooner . I've been away . John
JWD
Martinlf
Martinlf's profile picture
Moderator
Palmyra PA

Posts: 3047
Martinlf on Mar 14, 2007March 14th, 2007, 1:18 pm EDT
No problem. If you get a chance let us know what you think of the book. Tight lines.
"He spread them a yard and a half. 'And every one that got away is this big.'"

--Fred Chappell
John_don04
Northeastern,PA

Posts: 3
John_don04 on Mar 15, 2007March 15th, 2007, 1:06 pm EDT
I'll do that . Thanks !
JWD
GONZO
Site Editor
"Bear Swamp," PA

Posts: 1681
GONZO on Mar 17, 2007March 17th, 2007, 1:38 pm EDT
Hi John,

It's nice to hear from someone who hails from my old stomping grounds in NE PA. I agree with Jason that the dark flies on the snow pack were probably early black or brown stonefly species. Aside from midges and the odd winter caddisfly, these "snowflies" are the most commonly encountered winter species. The Lehigh has a wealth of stonefly species that are important throughout the season. Where were you on the Lehigh--the Gorge, or the upper river above the F.E.W.?

Best,
Gonzo

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