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Lateral view of a Female Hexagenia limbata (Ephemeridae) (Hex) Mayfly Dun from the Namekagon River in Wisconsin
Hex Mayflies
Hexagenia limbata

The famous nocturnal Hex hatch of the Midwest (and a few other lucky locations) stirs to the surface mythically large brown trout that only touch streamers for the rest of the year.

27" brown trout, my largest ever. It was the sub-dominant fish in its pool. After this, I hooked the bigger one, but I couldn't land it.
Troutnut is a project started in 2003 by salmonid ecologist Jason "Troutnut" Neuswanger to help anglers and fly tyers unabashedly embrace the entomological side of the sport. Learn more about Troutnut or support the project for an enhanced experience here.

Martinlf
Martinlf's profile picture
Moderator
Palmyra PA

Posts: 3047
Martinlf on Jan 22, 2007January 22nd, 2007, 10:50 am EST
Very interesting. Thanks for the input.
"He spread them a yard and a half. 'And every one that got away is this big.'"

--Fred Chappell
Brntrout
S.E. MN

Posts: 5
Brntrout on Feb 26, 2007February 26th, 2007, 1:40 am EST
I tie my own leaders so I have the opportunity switch to either mono or fluorocarbon tippets quite quickly. My leaders are built of mono in the butt section and mid section, the tippet section is fluoro when nymphing and mono when dry fly fishing.

Actually using fluoro for dry fly fishing works fine if your NOT fishing small size flies. A size 16 or larger fly seems to float long enough to get a decent drift before you have to recast but the smaller size flies become emergers real quick because of fluorocarbon's sinking qualities.

However, that situation isn't a cause for concern at times, it can be a benefit when fishing BWO hatches. The weather conditions that BWO's like to emerge in, usually dictates there will be a large percentage of cripple duns, emergers and duns on the water at the same time. The trout of course, take the flies that are the easestto capture, that being the cripple duns and emergers.

Anyway I got off the subject. Regarding the brands of tippet material I like best, I like Rio Fluorocarbon Plus & Rio mono. I can't think of to many brands of tippet material I haven't tried, for me the Rio products get the job done just fine!

Regarding how fluorocarbon breaks down VS mono, I don't see this as a major problem. I don't see mono or fluoro laying around on the ground where I fish. I guess, if there was a problem along that line I would consider it a big deal.

Besides, I would worry a lot more about increased sediment bedloads, ag chemicals and other pollutants entering our streams before I would get too excited about a few bits & pieces of fluorocarbon laying around on the ground! That is what I consider the REAL environmental issues we have out there!

brntrout

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