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Lateral view of a Female Hexagenia limbata (Ephemeridae) (Hex) Mayfly Dun from the Namekagon River in Wisconsin
Hex Mayflies
Hexagenia limbata

The famous nocturnal Hex hatch of the Midwest (and a few other lucky locations) stirs to the surface mythically large brown trout that only touch streamers for the rest of the year.

Lateral view of a Male Baetidae (Blue-Winged Olive) Mayfly Dun from Mystery Creek #308 in Washington
This dun emerged from a mature nymph on my desk. Unfortunately its wings didn't perfectly dry out.
27" brown trout, my largest ever. It was the sub-dominant fish in its pool. After this, I hooked the bigger one, but I couldn't land it.
Troutnut is a project started in 2003 by salmonid ecologist Jason "Troutnut" Neuswanger to help anglers and fly tyers unabashedly embrace the entomological side of the sport. Learn more about Troutnut or support the project for an enhanced experience here.

Motrout
Motrout's profile picture
Posts: 319
Motrout on Oct 27, 2010October 27th, 2010, 12:23 pm EDT
I hear that the DEC in New York is suffering some big cuts now-I heard about this from a fly fishing friend who lives up in the Adirondacks who seemed very upset about this. I also heard that one of the bigger Adirondack trout hatcheries (the Essex County Hatchery) is closing it up soon. I'm a little concerned about how this may effect the West Branch of the Ausable, Boquet, Saranac, and other rivers that I frequent on my annual trip up that way. Has anyone heard about this, and what do you think the effects will be?

If this is a controversial topic, I promise I'm not trying to stir the pot- it just sounded kind of alarming.
"I don't know what fly fishing teaches us, but I think it's something we need to know."-John Gierach
http://fishingintheozarks.blogspot.com/
Softhackle
Softhackle's profile picture
Wellsville, NY

Posts: 540
Softhackle on Oct 27, 2010October 27th, 2010, 2:41 pm EDT
Don't know, but as usual, one of the departments that generates the most money gets cut the hardest. Supposedly, all the license increases last year was suppose to help fund existing and new programs for DEC. I knew then it'd never happen because what DEC generates for itself usually ends up in "General Fund". It's a lot of hooey!

Mark

More: Here's what I've heard about some cuts:
Agency was told to lay off 209 staff, on top of 260 early retirement incentive approvals this year. This leaves the agency with 2,926 staff, a 23 percent reduction from 2007-08.

The DEC is bearing 10 percent of all state layoffs, although the agency only accounts for 2.5 percent of the total state workforce.

In the last 2.5 years, the agency has lost 595 employees, 16 percent of its workforce.

The DEC’s non-personal services budget (travel and equipment for inspections, oil clean ups) has been cut in half from 2007-08 to 2010-11.
"I have the highest respect for the skilled wet-fly fisherman, as he has mastered an art of very great difficulty." Edward R. Hewitt

Flymphs, Soft-hackles and Spiders: http://www.troutnut.com/libstudio/FS&S/index.html
Motrout
Motrout's profile picture
Posts: 319
Motrout on Oct 28, 2010October 28th, 2010, 2:10 am EDT
Why does it always have to be our natural resources that bear so much of the pain for fiscal irresponsibility elsewhere? It's a very sad thing with this kind of stuff happens. I'd say all of us, no matter what state we're from, need to be on the lookout for it.

Some people tend to get the idea that managing our natural resources is an "extra" that should taken care of only when there is enough money left over from the "more important" programs. It seems that all too many people don't understand that the fly fishing and other outdoor sports are truly a way of life for us, nothing short of that. If our natural resources are abused because we don't think it is important to take care of them, then I would make the case that none of the other "more important" things are going to matter much. If as Americans we don't start considering the environment even when economic times are bad, we are going to see some very grim results in the near future. I hope it doesn't come to that. I'm not even from anywhere near New York, but this is still almost too painful to watch. Because the same thing could happen to any of us in the next couple years.

And that concludes today's sermon...................

"I don't know what fly fishing teaches us, but I think it's something we need to know."-John Gierach
http://fishingintheozarks.blogspot.com/
Softhackle
Softhackle's profile picture
Wellsville, NY

Posts: 540
Softhackle on Oct 28, 2010October 28th, 2010, 3:35 am EDT
The thing is, Motrout, is we foot the bill to improve our environment, everybody benefits, especially other government agencies.

Mark
"I have the highest respect for the skilled wet-fly fisherman, as he has mastered an art of very great difficulty." Edward R. Hewitt

Flymphs, Soft-hackles and Spiders: http://www.troutnut.com/libstudio/FS&S/index.html
PaulRoberts
PaulRoberts's profile picture
Colorado

Posts: 1776
PaulRoberts on Oct 28, 2010October 28th, 2010, 4:43 am EDT
The "General Fund" allocation is unfortunate.

I was a DEC fisheries tech in 85. At that time the DEC was socked with a huge shortfall. It cut projects and jobs. What I remember most were some senior techs griping about politics giving a green light to violators of water quality regulations, and a loss of CO's to handle it. And I remember seeing a trout stream --I believe it was Sing-Sing--where somebody ran a bulldozer through it. Our shocking crew was upset that the nearest CO would never fit it into his burgeoned schedule.

Why does it always have to be our natural resources that bear so much of the pain for fiscal irresponsibility elsewhere?


Because it's not of value to the majority. Most people do not have experience and therefore any understanding of nature. A good book on the subject: "The Last Child in the Woods" by Richard Louv.

But... if everyone really valued it, it would keep all those people playing hooky (irresponsible) and our rapacious society would crumble. Then we'd be all be left defending our trout with stone points again. Guess there's no turning back is there. :)
Konchu
Konchu's profile picture
Site Editor
Indiana

Posts: 498
Konchu on Oct 28, 2010October 28th, 2010, 12:34 pm EDT
Natural Resource issues usually don't follow a 2-4 year cycle, depending on who's counting.
Juliew9855
Posts: 1
Juliew9855 on Oct 28, 2010October 28th, 2010, 8:07 pm EDT
Hi !
I've just visited this forum. Happy to get acquainted with you. Thanks.





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