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Artistic view of a Male Pteronarcys californica (Pteronarcyidae) (Giant Salmonfly) Stonefly Adult from the Gallatin River in Montana
Salmonflies
Pteronarcys californica

The giant Salmonflies of the Western mountains are legendary for their proclivity to elicit consistent dry-fly action and ferocious strikes.

Lateral view of a Onocosmoecus (Limnephilidae) (Great Late-Summer Sedge) Caddisfly Larva from the Yakima River in Washington
This specimen keys pretty easily to Onocosmoecus, and it closely resembles a specimen from Alaska which caddis expert Dave Ruiter recognized as this genus. As with that specimen, the only species in the genus documented in this area is Onocosmoecus unicolor, but Dave suggested for that specimen that there might be multiple not-yet-distinguished species under the unicolor umbrella and it would be best to stick with the genus-level ID. I'm doing the same for this one.
27" brown trout, my largest ever. It was the sub-dominant fish in its pool. After this, I hooked the bigger one, but I couldn't land it.
Troutnut is a project started in 2003 by salmonid ecologist Jason "Troutnut" Neuswanger to help anglers and fly tyers unabashedly embrace the entomological side of the sport. Learn more about Troutnut or support the project for an enhanced experience here.

Martinlf
Martinlf's profile picture
Moderator
Palmyra PA

Posts: 3047
Martinlf on Nov 26, 2020November 26th, 2020, 11:55 am EST
I'm not a big streamer fisherman, but when targeting smallmouth with streamers I often go to my 9'6" rod. It seems a longer rod can give a bit more distance. As for brand, I'd leave that to others familiar with these rods. I'm not.
"He spread them a yard and a half. 'And every one that got away is this big.'"

--Fred Chappell
Wbranch
Wbranch's profile picture
York & Starlight PA

Posts: 2635
Wbranch on Nov 26, 2020November 26th, 2020, 11:29 pm EST
I doubt there is any rod built strictly to throw streamers. It pretty much depends on how big most of the streamers you will be fishing are and the size of the waters you will be fishing. I fish streamers quite a bit and have caught hundreds of 18" - 24" trout on them. For most of my streamer work I use either a 9' #7 Gatti or a 9' #6 Redington. I can throw a sink tip line 60' for a couple of hours. After that I get tired but then I'm 77 years old.
Catskill fly fisher for fifty-five years.
Partsman
Partsman's profile picture
bancroft michigan

Posts: 321
Partsman on Nov 27, 2020November 27th, 2020, 6:20 am EST
I saw your question on another website and I think you got some good answers. I personally like my 9'6" orvis recon, and the orvis bankshot line, but thats just me. I think for a line the bank shot or single hand spey line the leader might be just as important for decent casting results. But its all fun and better than sitting at home watching the boob tube.
Mike.
Wbranch
Wbranch's profile picture
York & Starlight PA

Posts: 2635
Wbranch on Jan 16, 2021January 16th, 2021, 5:23 am EST
Grayson wrote;

Thomas and Thomas Exocett SS 250. I think it's best.


It is hard to say any particular rod is the "best". What are the criteria for the best rod? It's all quite subjective and what is best for you might be junk for someone else.
Catskill fly fisher for fifty-five years.
Red_green_h
Red_green_h's profile picture
New Mexico

Posts: 64
Red_green_h on Jan 16, 2021January 16th, 2021, 7:15 am EST
It is hard to say any particular rod is the "best". What are the criteria for the best rod? It's all quite subjective and what is best for you might be junk for someone else.


I gotta agree with this statement. My buddy says the same about Scott rods and won't buy anything but. I got my 12 yo an Echo Base 7'6" 3wt combo for his bday and I tried it out and outfished my buddy with his $1500 set up. And not because I'm God's gift to fly fishing by any stretch. But I gauruntee you my buddy wouldn't be caught dead with what I was fishing with.
Wbranch
Wbranch's profile picture
York & Starlight PA

Posts: 2635
Wbranch on Jan 16, 2021January 16th, 2021, 11:01 am EST
Red_green wrote;

But I guarantee you my buddy wouldn't be caught dead with what I was fishing with.


There was a time about 25 years ago when low and middle end fly rods and reels were not of very good quality and casting with them was a challenge. But today and for the past 10 or so years low and mid level fly rods have better construction, better actions, have more eye appeal, and are just overall good fishing tools.

There are dozens of fly rods available for between $50 & $100 that will provide hours of pleasure and may be the only rod you ever buy or it mat be the stepping stone to get a more expensive fly rod.
Catskill fly fisher for fifty-five years.

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