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Lateral view of a Male Baetis (Baetidae) (Blue-Winged Olive) Mayfly Dun from Mystery Creek #43 in New York
Blue-winged Olives
Baetis

Tiny Baetis mayflies are perhaps the most commonly encountered and imitated by anglers on all American trout streams due to their great abundance, widespread distribution, and trout-friendly emergence habits.

Dorsal view of a Neoleptophlebia (Leptophlebiidae) Mayfly Nymph from the Yakima River in Washington
Some characteristics from the microscope images for the tentative species id: The postero-lateral projections are found only on segment 9, not segment 8. Based on the key in Jacobus et al. (2014), it appears to key to Neoleptophlebia adoptiva or Neoleptophlebia heteronea, same as this specimen with pretty different abdominal markings. However, distinguishing between those calls for comparing the lengths of the second and third segment of the labial palp, and this one (like the other one) only seems to have two segments. So I'm stuck on them both. It's likely that the fact that they're immature nymphs stymies identification in some important way.
27" brown trout, my largest ever. It was the sub-dominant fish in its pool. After this, I hooked the bigger one, but I couldn't land it.
Troutnut is a project started in 2003 by salmonid ecologist Jason "Troutnut" Neuswanger to help anglers and fly tyers unabashedly embrace the entomological side of the sport. Learn more about Troutnut or support the project for an enhanced experience here.

Updates from July 13, 2017

Updates from July 13, 2017

Photos by Troutnut from the American River in Washington

The American River in Washington
The American River in Washington
Elk tracks all over the gravel bars

From the American River in Washington
After an hour or more of getting skunked in beautiful water, I finally found a decent rising trout and got it to hit in this pool. Naturally, I had tied a knot poorly and it broke off on the hookset.

From the American River in Washington
The American River in Washington
The American River in Washington
The American River in Washington
The American River in Washington
The American River in Washington
The American River in Washington
The American River in Washington

Closeup insects by Troutnut from the American River in Washington

Lateral view of a Female Drunella grandis (Ephemerellidae) (Western Green Drake) Mayfly Dun from the American River in Washington
I collected this specimen while away from all my good photography equipment except the camera and one of my macro lenses, so I made do. The lighting is from lamps in a hotel room, so it was hard to edit for really true colors, but I tried to get as close as possible. The body was 13 mm long, wing 19 mm long.

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