Header image
Enter a name
Lateral view of a Female Hexagenia limbata (Ephemeridae) (Hex) Mayfly Dun from the Namekagon River in Wisconsin
Hex Mayflies
Hexagenia limbata

The famous nocturnal Hex hatch of the Midwest (and a few other lucky locations) stirs to the surface mythically large brown trout that only touch streamers for the rest of the year.

Dorsal view of a Holocentropus (Polycentropodidae) Caddisfly Larva from the Yakima River in Washington
This one seems to tentatively key to Holocentropus, although I can't make out the anal spines in Couplet 7 of the Key to Genera of Polycentropodidae Larvae nor the dark bands in Couplet 4 of the Key to Genera of Polycentropodidae Larvae, making me wonder if I went wrong somewhere in keying it out. I don't see where that could have happened, though. It might also be that it's a very immature larva and doesn't possess all the identifying characteristics in the key yet. If Holocentropus is correct, then Holocentropus flavus and Holocentropus interruptus are the two likely possibilities based on range, but I was not able to find a description of their larvae.
27" brown trout, my largest ever. It was the sub-dominant fish in its pool. After this, I hooked the bigger one, but I couldn't land it.
Troutnut is a project started in 2003 by salmonid ecologist Jason "Troutnut" Neuswanger to help anglers and fly tyers unabashedly embrace the entomological side of the sport. Learn more about Troutnut or support the project for an enhanced experience here.

Vtbrowns57
Vtbrowns57's profile picture
Posts: 6
Vtbrowns57 on Mar 28, 2019March 28th, 2019, 5:51 am EDT
Does anyone have any suggestions for early season stonefly patterns for the Northeast that aren't to difficult to tie? I'm working with black goose biots, black/brown angora goat dubbing, and turkey feathers..

Thanks!!

-Alex

Martinlf
Martinlf's profile picture
Moderator
Palmyra PA

Posts: 3047
Martinlf on Mar 29, 2019March 29th, 2019, 11:43 pm EDT
A very good Delaware River guide gave me a dry fly pattern years ago that he swears by. It's very simple: black or brown body of any dry fly dubbing, a downwing, caddis style, of clear/white zelon or antron, and hackle at the thorax to match the body color. Tie off the hackle and you're done. For nymphs any basic simple pattern will work. I just made mine up, with no fancy wingcase. I did use small rubber legs on some of them. For some ideas, use Google.
"He spread them a yard and a half. 'And every one that got away is this big.'"

--Fred Chappell
Vtbrowns57
Vtbrowns57's profile picture
Posts: 6
Vtbrowns57 on Apr 1, 2019April 1st, 2019, 8:27 am EDT
Hi Martinlf,

Thanks for sharing that pattern, i'll have to experiment and spend some time at the vise. I also like the small rubber legs for the nymphs as well.

Alex

Jmd123
Jmd123's profile picture
Oscoda, MI

Posts: 2474
Jmd123 on Apr 2, 2019April 2nd, 2019, 5:50 am EDT
Try an #12-14 Elk Hair Caddis tied in Early Brown Stone colors - a golden-brown body and a grayish brown wing & hackle. I had browns hitting this pattern in mid-April in the Rifle River here in MI some years ago (not this one!). Couldn't hook them though! Fortunately a nice 14-incher slammed a POG Bugger on my way down to the car - so hard in fact I thought it was a steelhead - and saved me from being skunked for the day...Good luck!

Jonathon
No matter how big the one you just caught is, there's always a bigger one out there somewhere...
Crepuscular
Crepuscular's profile picture
Boiling Springs, PA

Posts: 920
Crepuscular on Apr 3, 2019April 3rd, 2019, 2:40 am EDT
Does anyone have any suggestions for early season stonefly patterns for the Northeast that aren't to difficult to tie? I'm working with black goose biots, black/brown angora goat dubbing, and turkey feathers..

Thanks!!

-Alex


Hi Alex. Welcome to Troutnut. Louis is right on with that simple Early Stonefly. Here is another:

Hook: any 1xl dry fly hook (I tie all my early season stoneflies on Hends 323BL #16 and #18) but use whatever size your bugs are.
Thread: Black or Reddish Brown 12/0 veevus
Tail: very short clump of dark dun or black cdc (about 1/2 the hook gap in length)
Abdomen: Dark Dun hackle palmered over black or mahogany dubbing.
Underwing: 6 strands of pearl crystal flash
Overwing: Light Dun Snowshoe hare tied to extend to just past the abdomen
Thorax:Dark dun hackle over black or mahogany dubbing

This is just a derivation of a stimulator, tied with materials that I find float better and is a little easier to tie. You can substitute CDC for the wing instead of the snowshoe.

Eric

Quick Reply

Related Discussions

Topic
Replies
Last Reply
3
Feb 22, 2010
by Jim584th
1
May 21, 2015
by Troutnut
Troutnut.com is copyright © 2004-2024 (email Jason). privacy policy