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Lateral view of a Male Baetis (Baetidae) (Blue-Winged Olive) Mayfly Dun from Mystery Creek #43 in New York
Blue-winged Olives
Baetis

Tiny Baetis mayflies are perhaps the most commonly encountered and imitated by anglers on all American trout streams due to their great abundance, widespread distribution, and trout-friendly emergence habits.

Lateral view of a Clostoeca disjuncta (Limnephilidae) (Northern Caddisfly) Caddisfly Larva from the Yakima River in Washington
This one was surprisingly straightforward to identify. The lack of a sclerite at the base of the lateral hump narrows the field quite a bit, and the other options followed fairly obvious characteristics to Clostoeca, which only has one species, Clostoeca disjuncta.
27" brown trout, my largest ever. It was the sub-dominant fish in its pool. After this, I hooked the bigger one, but I couldn't land it.
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Millcreek has attached these 2 pictures to aid in identification. The message is below.
Millcreek
Healdsburg, CA

Posts: 344
Millcreek on Nov 21, 2017November 21st, 2017, 2:05 pm EST
These are usually found in slow to stagnant areas in the Russian River. They are approximately 16-20 mm long and are found in the river from June through August.

Jonathan - Are these the dragonfly naiads you saw? They vary quite a bit in coloration.
"If we knew what it was we were doing, it would not be called research, would it?"
-Albert Einstein
Jmd123
Jmd123's profile picture
Oscoda, MI

Posts: 2474
Jmd123 on Nov 28, 2017November 28th, 2017, 9:39 am EST
The shape is certainly right! I read your other post and I will definitely have to send you photos next season. They can change when they molt, huh? As far as spectacular color changes go, I saw an octopus go from solid slate grey to spotted all over in an instant, down in Key West when I was a kid. Of course, they have micromuscles controlling the opening and closing of pores to pigment glands, all driven by probably the most developed brain in the invertebrate world! Much as we all love insects, they're just not THAT cool...

Jonathon
No matter how big the one you just caught is, there's always a bigger one out there somewhere...

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