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Lateral view of a Male Baetis (Baetidae) (Blue-Winged Olive) Mayfly Dun from Mystery Creek #43 in New York
Blue-winged Olives
Baetis

Tiny Baetis mayflies are perhaps the most commonly encountered and imitated by anglers on all American trout streams due to their great abundance, widespread distribution, and trout-friendly emergence habits.

Dorsal view of a Pycnopsyche guttifera (Limnephilidae) (Great Autumn Brown Sedge) Caddisfly Larva from the Yakima River in Washington
This specimen appears to be of the same species as this one collected in the same spot two months earlier. The identification of both is tentative. This one suffered some physical damage before being photographed, too, so the colors aren't totally natural. I was mostly photographing it to test out some new camera setting idea, which worked really well for a couple of closeups.
27" brown trout, my largest ever. It was the sub-dominant fish in its pool. After this, I hooked the bigger one, but I couldn't land it.
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Millcreek has attached these 5 pictures to aid in identification. The message is below.
Millcreek
Healdsburg, CA

Posts: 344
Millcreek on Nov 11, 2017November 11th, 2017, 10:18 am EST
These are found in the Russian River in shallow to moderate depths of water with a good flow. They are usually found February through April. The naiads are about 16 - 20 mm in length at maturity.
"If we knew what it was we were doing, it would not be called research, would it?"
-Albert Einstein
Jmd123
Jmd123's profile picture
Oscoda, MI

Posts: 2474
Jmd123 on Nov 12, 2017November 12th, 2017, 2:28 am EST
Beautiful creature. But if I were small, I wouldn't want to meet one of those on a dark night under a lily pad...

Jonathon
No matter how big the one you just caught is, there's always a bigger one out there somewhere...
Millcreek
Healdsburg, CA

Posts: 344
Millcreek on Nov 12, 2017November 12th, 2017, 2:59 am EST
Beautiful creature. But if I were small, I wouldn't want to meet one of those on a dark night under a lily pad...


I wouldn't want to either. Minding your own business, then that labium shoots out and you're gone.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pkOpWKyM_go
"If we knew what it was we were doing, it would not be called research, would it?"
-Albert Einstein
Millcreek
Healdsburg, CA

Posts: 344
Millcreek on Nov 20, 2017November 20th, 2017, 7:22 am EST
deleted edit.
"If we knew what it was we were doing, it would not be called research, would it?"
-Albert Einstein
Jmd123
Jmd123's profile picture
Oscoda, MI

Posts: 2474
Jmd123 on Nov 21, 2017November 21st, 2017, 9:50 am EST
Hmmm...looks like someone was uninvited to our site. Having only read the post about the "stink bug you freaking idiots", I could tell he didn't belong here - and not only because he apparently doesn't know (expletive deleted) about insects.

The coolest dragonfly nymphs I have seen recently were a bunch of leaf-green ones with light stripes down their sides, and fairly slender bodies, taken from some emergent grass in shallow water from [REDACTED] Pond. Sadly, their color didn't last in 70% ethanol. Are there other green dragonflies out there I don't know about? These were the first and only ones I've ever seen. Perhaps next season I'll grab a few for a photo and put them up ion here for our "bugnuts" to identify.

Jonathon
No matter how big the one you just caught is, there's always a bigger one out there somewhere...
Creno
Grants Pass, OR

Posts: 302
Creno on Nov 22, 2017November 22nd, 2017, 9:58 am EST
Here is a reference for immature odonate coloration. Dragonflies Behavior and Ecology of the Odonata Philip S. Corbet, 1999, Comstock Publishing Associates,
Cornell University Press, Ithaca, NY.

It indicates that the immatures can change color to match habitat but it is a slow process occurring at the molts.

I suspect camouflage is important for lots of reasons for all insects. I doubt any insect coloration changes occur as fast as we see in things like the octopus videos. totally different structural and nervous systems.

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