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Lateral view of a Female Hexagenia limbata (Ephemeridae) (Hex) Mayfly Dun from the Namekagon River in Wisconsin
Hex Mayflies
Hexagenia limbata

The famous nocturnal Hex hatch of the Midwest (and a few other lucky locations) stirs to the surface mythically large brown trout that only touch streamers for the rest of the year.

Dorsal view of a Pycnopsyche guttifera (Limnephilidae) (Great Autumn Brown Sedge) Caddisfly Larva from the Yakima River in Washington
This specimen appears to be of the same species as this one collected in the same spot two months earlier. The identification of both is tentative. This one suffered some physical damage before being photographed, too, so the colors aren't totally natural. I was mostly photographing it to test out some new camera setting idea, which worked really well for a couple of closeups.
27" brown trout, my largest ever. It was the sub-dominant fish in its pool. After this, I hooked the bigger one, but I couldn't land it.
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Millcreek has attached these 7 pictures to aid in identification. The message is below.
Female. Callibaetis sp. 7mm excluding cerci.
Female. Callibaetis sp. 7mm excluding cerci.
Female. Callibaetis sp. 7mm excluding cerci.
Female. Callibaetis sp. 7mm excluding cerci.
Male. Callibaetis sp. 6mm excluding cerci.
Males. Callibaetis sp. 6mm excluding cerci.
Female. Callibaetis sp. 7mm excluding cerci.
Millcreek
Healdsburg, CA

Posts: 344
Millcreek on Apr 28, 2015April 28th, 2015, 7:20 pm EDT
These are common in the Russian River. They're usually found in cutoff pools. The pools have stagnant water with large algal growths and temperatures are higher than the river itself.

They're probably Callibaetis pictus since the adults are common at the river right now.
"If we knew what it was we were doing, it would not be called research, would it?"
-Albert Einstein
PaulRoberts
PaulRoberts's profile picture
Colorado

Posts: 1776
PaulRoberts on Apr 29, 2015April 29th, 2015, 3:29 pm EDT
Pretty critter. They look a bit like Siphlonurus. I wonder how closely related the two might be?
Millcreek
Healdsburg, CA

Posts: 344
Millcreek on Apr 29, 2015April 29th, 2015, 6:52 pm EDT
Probably pretty closely related. Callibaetis belongs in Baetidae while Siphlonurus belongs in Metretopodidae generally a limb below Baetidae on a tree of life. Can be seen in common names as well: Small Minnow Mayflys for Baetidae and Primitive Minnow Mayflys for Siphlonurus.

Easiest field ID is Siphlonurus has short antennae (about head length) while Callibaetis has long antennae (about 3 or 4 times length of head).
"If we knew what it was we were doing, it would not be called research, would it?"
-Albert Einstein
Taxon
Taxon's profile picture
Site Editor
Plano, TX

Posts: 1311
Taxon on Apr 29, 2015April 29th, 2015, 8:42 pm EDT
Hi Mark-

while Siphlonurus belongs in Metretopodidae

I believe Siphlonurus is in family Siphlonuridae, whereas Siphloplecton is in family Metretopodidae.
Best regards,
Roger Rohrbeck
www.FlyfishingEntomology.com
Millcreek
Healdsburg, CA

Posts: 344
Millcreek on Apr 29, 2015April 29th, 2015, 8:56 pm EDT
Roger-

I believe Siphlonurus is in family Siphlonuridae, whereas Siphloplecton is in family Metretopodidae.


You're right, my mistake.
"If we knew what it was we were doing, it would not be called research, would it?"
-Albert Einstein
Taxon
Taxon's profile picture
Site Editor
Plano, TX

Posts: 1311
Taxon on Apr 29, 2015April 29th, 2015, 9:59 pm EDT
No problem, Mark. Many viewers would label me as a/r for even having mentioned it :-)
Best regards,
Roger Rohrbeck
www.FlyfishingEntomology.com
PaulRoberts
PaulRoberts's profile picture
Colorado

Posts: 1776
PaulRoberts on Apr 30, 2015April 30th, 2015, 1:54 am EDT
Definitely mention/correct where needed, Roger. That's what makes this site so good.

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