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Artistic view of a Male Pteronarcys californica (Pteronarcyidae) (Giant Salmonfly) Stonefly Adult from the Gallatin River in Montana
Salmonflies
Pteronarcys californica

The giant Salmonflies of the Western mountains are legendary for their proclivity to elicit consistent dry-fly action and ferocious strikes.

Dorsal view of a Amphizoa (Amphizoidae) Beetle Larva from Sears Creek in Washington
This is the first of it's family I've seen, collected from a tiny, fishless stream in the Cascades. The three species of this genus all live in the Northwest and are predators that primarily eat stonefly nymphs Merritt R.W., Cummins, K.W., and Berg, M.B. (2019).
27" brown trout, my largest ever. It was the sub-dominant fish in its pool. After this, I hooked the bigger one, but I couldn't land it.
Troutnut is a project started in 2003 by salmonid ecologist Jason "Troutnut" Neuswanger to help anglers and fly tyers unabashedly embrace the entomological side of the sport. Learn more about Troutnut or support the project for an enhanced experience here.

Diver has attached this picture to aid in identification. The message is below.
Diver
Northern Ontario

Posts: 2
Diver on Sep 11, 2016September 11th, 2016, 6:21 pm EDT
Hi there, I found this insect skittering on the surface of a lake. Is this a terrestrial insect that blew onto the water? I cannot find a similar picture. I thought it might be a caddis species. This was in northern ontario on a canadian shield lake.

Thank you, Richard
Taxon
Taxon's profile picture
Site Editor
Plano, TX

Posts: 1311
Taxon on Sep 11, 2016September 11th, 2016, 9:04 pm EDT
Hi Richard-

I believe it to be the aquatic moth, Lomographa semiclarata (Bluish Spring Moth).
Best regards,
Roger Rohrbeck
www.FlyfishingEntomology.com
Millcreek
Healdsburg, CA

Posts: 344
Millcreek on Sep 12, 2016September 12th, 2016, 7:53 am EDT
Roger,

I believe it to be the aquatic moth, Lomographa semiclarata (Bluish Spring Moth).


I think it's likely L. semiclarata as well, but it's not aquatic as far as I can determine. The larvae feed on alders, chokecerries, juneberries, hawthorns, poplars and Prunus sp. I can't determine where it pupates, but there are no references to underwater pupation.

Mark
"If we knew what it was we were doing, it would not be called research, would it?"
-Albert Einstein
Taxon
Taxon's profile picture
Site Editor
Plano, TX

Posts: 1311
Taxon on Sep 12, 2016September 12th, 2016, 8:53 am EDT
Mark-

Yes, I should have said non-aquatic. :-)
Best regards,
Roger Rohrbeck
www.FlyfishingEntomology.com
Millcreek
Healdsburg, CA

Posts: 344
Millcreek on Sep 12, 2016September 12th, 2016, 10:45 am EDT
Roger,

Just keeping you honest :).
"If we knew what it was we were doing, it would not be called research, would it?"
-Albert Einstein
Diver
Northern Ontario

Posts: 2
Diver on Sep 12, 2016September 12th, 2016, 12:15 pm EDT
Hello and thank you! I had a great deal of fun last night after posting using various keys trying to come up with the species. I did not come anywhere close to the right guess! Thanks again Taxon and Millcreek.

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