Header image
Enter a name
Artistic view of a Male Pteronarcys californica (Pteronarcyidae) (Giant Salmonfly) Stonefly Adult from the Gallatin River in Montana
Salmonflies
Pteronarcys californica

The giant Salmonflies of the Western mountains are legendary for their proclivity to elicit consistent dry-fly action and ferocious strikes.

Dorsal view of a Epeorus albertae (Heptageniidae) (Pink Lady) Mayfly Nymph from the East Fork Issaquah Creek in Washington
This specimen keys to the Epeorus albertae group of species. Of the five species in that group, the two known in Washington state are Epeorus albertae and Epeorus dulciana. Of the two, albertae has been collected in vastly more locations in Washington than dulciana, suggesting it is far more common. On that basis alone I'm tentatively putting this nymph in albertae, with the large caveat that there's no real information to rule out dulciana.
27" brown trout, my largest ever. It was the sub-dominant fish in its pool. After this, I hooked the bigger one, but I couldn't land it.
Troutnut is a project started in 2003 by salmonid ecologist Jason "Troutnut" Neuswanger to help anglers and fly tyers unabashedly embrace the entomological side of the sport. Learn more about Troutnut or support the project for an enhanced experience here.

Btbo32 has attached these 2 pictures to aid in identification. The message is below.
Btbo32
Posts: 13
Btbo32 on Feb 17, 2020February 17th, 2020, 1:24 pm EST
So I was doing some Winter fly fishing in Northwestern New Jersey. I’ve had caught a few Caddis casings in my time but not this! Sorry for the background picture might be hard to identify this bug? I think a mayfly nymph but not sure?? Can anyone help?
Jersey Boy
Wbranch
Wbranch's profile picture
York & Starlight PA

Posts: 2635
Wbranch on Feb 17, 2020February 17th, 2020, 4:47 pm EST
I hope you weren't fishing in a fly only stream. You might have a hard time explaining that to a fish warden. Yes it is a mayfly nymph. There is at least a 100% chance I'm wrong so one of the other experts hopefully will also chime in.
Catskill fly fisher for fifty-five years.
Millcreek
Healdsburg, CA

Posts: 344
Millcreek on Feb 17, 2020February 17th, 2020, 10:51 pm EST
I don't think it's an Epeorus because it appears to have three tails rather than the two an Epeorus would have. As to what it actually is, other than a mayfly nymph, your guess is as good as mine.
"If we knew what it was we were doing, it would not be called research, would it?"
-Albert Einstein
Taxon
Taxon's profile picture
Site Editor
Plano, TX

Posts: 1311
Taxon on Feb 18, 2020February 18th, 2020, 7:52 am EST
:-)
Best regards,
Roger Rohrbeck
www.FlyfishingEntomology.com
Wbranch
Wbranch's profile picture
York & Starlight PA

Posts: 2635
Wbranch on Feb 18, 2020February 18th, 2020, 7:54 am EST
My uninformed response was incorrect.
Catskill fly fisher for fifty-five years.
Taxon
Taxon's profile picture
Site Editor
Plano, TX

Posts: 1311
Taxon on Feb 18, 2020February 18th, 2020, 5:35 pm EST
Hi Matt-

Sorry to have disappointed you. I too had no idea what it was, other than sharing Mark's belief that its 3 tails eliminated the possibility of it being of genus Epeorus. And truth be known, until after having seen Mark's post, I hadn't even observed that it had 3 tails. :-)

Best regards,

Roger
Best regards,
Roger Rohrbeck
www.FlyfishingEntomology.com
Wbranch
Wbranch's profile picture
York & Starlight PA

Posts: 2635
Wbranch on Feb 19, 2020February 19th, 2020, 12:16 am EST
Catskill fly fisher for fifty-five years.

Quick Reply

Related Discussions

Topic
Replies
Last Reply
3
Nov 20, 2017
by Wbranch
Re: Epeorus Featured Topic
In the Identify This! Board by Crepuscular
33
Apr 19, 2012
by Crepuscular
Troutnut.com is copyright © 2004-2024 (email Jason). privacy policy