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Artistic view of a Male Pteronarcys californica (Pteronarcyidae) (Giant Salmonfly) Stonefly Adult from the Gallatin River in Montana
Salmonflies
Pteronarcys californica

The giant Salmonflies of the Western mountains are legendary for their proclivity to elicit consistent dry-fly action and ferocious strikes.

Ventral view of a Hydropsyche (Hydropsychidae) (Spotted Sedge) Caddisfly Larva from the Yakima River in Washington
With a bit of help from the microscope, this specimen keys clearly and unsurprisingly to Hydropsyche.
27" brown trout, my largest ever. It was the sub-dominant fish in its pool. After this, I hooked the bigger one, but I couldn't land it.
Troutnut is a project started in 2003 by salmonid ecologist Jason "Troutnut" Neuswanger to help anglers and fly tyers unabashedly embrace the entomological side of the sport. Learn more about Troutnut or support the project for an enhanced experience here.

Catskilljon
Upstate NY

Posts: 160
Catskilljon on May 22, 2016May 22nd, 2016, 5:25 pm EDT
I was glassing a new section of stream today in the Catskills, in Sullivan County near my place.

I was observing from a rock wall 6 ft above the water. Out of the corner of my eye I saw flying toward me [and the stream] what initially looked like a #2 hook size stone fly, however this bug flew with a real purpose, not clumsily like stone flys do. It flew over the water, then just dropped into it with a splat, hard enough to make me think it got knocked out from the landing. I was glad it hit the water as this usually slows them down enough for me to see it clearly, but it actually went under and started swimming [quite proficiently I may add!] with a hinging motion. It stayed just under the surface and disappeared under one of the boulders I was standing above. It looked brownish/tan.

I wish I got a better look at it, but the whole thing happened in about 5 seconds. In the water and from about 10 ft away it looked more like a click beetle, at least the way it propelled itself subsurface, but this thing was much bigger, I would estimate it to be almost 2 inches long.

Any ideas? Im surry for being so vague but its all I got.
Taxon
Taxon's profile picture
Site Editor
Plano, TX

Posts: 1311
Taxon on May 22, 2016May 22nd, 2016, 7:58 pm EDT
Hi Catskilljon-

Based on the reported size, my guess would be a Predaceous Diving Beetle, which would max out at about 1.4 inches.
Best regards,
Roger Rohrbeck
www.FlyfishingEntomology.com
Wiflyfisher
Wiflyfisher's profile picture
Wisconsin

Posts: 622
Wiflyfisher on May 24, 2016May 24th, 2016, 9:55 am EDT
CJ, it was probably a micro-drone spying on you but luckily it's battery ran out. :-)

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