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Artistic view of a Male Pteronarcys californica (Pteronarcyidae) (Giant Salmonfly) Stonefly Adult from the Gallatin River in Montana
Salmonflies
Pteronarcys californica

The giant Salmonflies of the Western mountains are legendary for their proclivity to elicit consistent dry-fly action and ferocious strikes.

Lateral view of a Male Baetidae (Blue-Winged Olive) Mayfly Dun from Mystery Creek #308 in Washington
This dun emerged from a mature nymph on my desk. Unfortunately its wings didn't perfectly dry out.
27" brown trout, my largest ever. It was the sub-dominant fish in its pool. After this, I hooked the bigger one, but I couldn't land it.
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Millcreek has attached these 2 pictures to aid in identification. The message is below.
Cases about 9 mm.
Pupae about 7-8  mm.
Millcreek
Healdsburg, CA

Posts: 344
Millcreek on Nov 23, 2015November 23rd, 2015, 5:45 am EST
Thought I'd put these up in case anybody wanted to look at them. They're from this year, around August. The cases were found on medium to large cobbles in fairly calm areas.
"If we knew what it was we were doing, it would not be called research, would it?"
-Albert Einstein
PaulRoberts
PaulRoberts's profile picture
Colorado

Posts: 1776
PaulRoberts on Nov 23, 2015November 23rd, 2015, 7:41 am EST
Wow! Simply gorgeous.
Crepuscular
Crepuscular's profile picture
Boiling Springs, PA

Posts: 920
Crepuscular on Nov 23, 2015November 23rd, 2015, 7:48 am EST
Nice Mark.I've never seen that one here in PA only Psilotreta. Pretty sure we don't have the genus.
Millcreek
Healdsburg, CA

Posts: 344
Millcreek on Nov 24, 2015November 24th, 2015, 5:13 am EST
Paul,

Thanks. I saw these and couldn't resist the opportunity to record the different pupal stages.

Eric,

I'm sure you don't have the genus in PA. There are two species in the U.S. from what I understand. M. nobsca from Texas and M. flexuosa from California, Arizona, Texas and Arkansas.

Edit: A further look at range maps shows M. flexuosa in New Mexico, Oklahoma, Missouri, Indiana, Vermont and Ontario. And that's just as far as the U.S. and Canada are concerned, looks like it's common in Central and South America as well.
"If we knew what it was we were doing, it would not be called research, would it?"
-Albert Einstein

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