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Lateral view of a Female Hexagenia limbata (Ephemeridae) (Hex) Mayfly Dun from the Namekagon River in Wisconsin
Hex Mayflies
Hexagenia limbata

The famous nocturnal Hex hatch of the Midwest (and a few other lucky locations) stirs to the surface mythically large brown trout that only touch streamers for the rest of the year.

Lateral view of a Psychodidae True Fly Larva from Mystery Creek #308 in Washington
This wild-looking little thing completely puzzled me. At first I was thinking beetle or month larva, until I got a look at the pictures on the computer screen. I made a couple of incorrect guesses before entomologist Greg Courtney pointed me in the right direction with Psychodidae. He suggested a possible genus of Thornburghiella, but could not rule out some other members of the tribe Pericomini.
27" brown trout, my largest ever. It was the sub-dominant fish in its pool. After this, I hooked the bigger one, but I couldn't land it.
Troutnut is a project started in 2003 by salmonid ecologist Jason "Troutnut" Neuswanger to help anglers and fly tyers unabashedly embrace the entomological side of the sport. Learn more about Troutnut or support the project for an enhanced experience here.

Byhaugh
Hawaii

Posts: 56
Byhaugh on Feb 24, 2015February 24th, 2015, 7:56 pm EST
I realize there are many BWO variations as well as PMD's.

BUT,
In general, if a PMD spinner body is, generally speaking, a rust color, how would you describe the BWO spinner body color?
Thanks
Taxon
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Site Editor
Plano, TX

Posts: 1311
Taxon on Feb 25, 2015February 25th, 2015, 5:48 am EST
Hi Byron-

how would you describe the BWO spinner body color?


I'd say brown, varying all the way from a light tan to blackish brown.
Best regards,
Roger Rohrbeck
www.FlyfishingEntomology.com
Wbranch
Wbranch's profile picture
York & Starlight PA

Posts: 2635
Wbranch on Feb 25, 2015February 25th, 2015, 6:11 am EST
if a PMD spinner body is, generally speaking, a rust color


I agree that rust is one color of a PMD spinner but on the Western river that I fish we also see spinner bodies almost the same light greenish yellow that we see on the duns and also some that are tan. When I go out for my two week trip I have about eighteen each of rust, greenish yellow, and tan. Because you don't ever know what spinners will be on the water on any given day. Some days it is all rusty from 9:00 to 5:00 other days a mix of the greenish yellow and the tan and no rusty's. The only adult we see emerging is the PMD. There are no other apparent mayflies emerging simultaneously.

Catskill fly fisher for fifty-five years.
Martinlf
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Moderator
Palmyra PA

Posts: 3047
Martinlf on Feb 25, 2015February 25th, 2015, 6:54 am EST
I'd say brown, varying all the way from a light tan to blackish brown.


Well done, Roger. I couldn't think of one simple way to answer this, so I waited, and you did it. In the summer one stream I fish gets some size 24 or 26 tan spinners from an "olive" dun that is mustard colored. They fall right after Tricos. Cornuta spinners are often almost black. And there are a lot of bugs in sizes that fall between these.

I haven't fished out west more than once, but Matt's reply will be helpful if I get a chance to go back.
"He spread them a yard and a half. 'And every one that got away is this big.'"

--Fred Chappell
Byhaugh
Hawaii

Posts: 56
Byhaugh on Feb 25, 2015February 25th, 2015, 9:01 am EST
The reason I asked, is that I am using some spectrumized dubbing from Caucci's old Deleware River Club.
On the package, the color is called "charcoal" and it is blended to imitate B>W>O. (common name); E. kata (Genus/Species); stage (spinner)

This is the color of the dubbing:


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Byhaugh
Hawaii

Posts: 56
Byhaugh on Feb 25, 2015February 25th, 2015, 9:04 am EST
Sorry, E. late.....not kata
Taxon
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Site Editor
Plano, TX

Posts: 1311
Taxon on Feb 25, 2015February 25th, 2015, 10:28 am EST
Hi Byron-

Actually, it has been classified as Drunella lata for about 35 years. :-)
Best regards,
Roger Rohrbeck
www.FlyfishingEntomology.com
Martinlf
Martinlf's profile picture
Moderator
Palmyra PA

Posts: 3047
Martinlf on Feb 25, 2015February 25th, 2015, 1:28 pm EST
Byron, I use the DRC dubbing as well, and like it. Had good luck on Penns Creek one evening with cornuta spinners tied with a black thread body and DRC dark olive thorax. The charcoal should work well for the fly too. The thorax on these flies is especially pronounced. The folks at the DRC still don't use the new classifications, sticking with what matches Caucci's book, Hatches.
"He spread them a yard and a half. 'And every one that got away is this big.'"

--Fred Chappell
Crepuscular
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Boiling Springs, PA

Posts: 920
Crepuscular on Feb 26, 2015February 26th, 2015, 6:59 am EST
Hi Byron-

Actually, it has been classified as Drunella lata for about 35 years. :-)


:)
Byhaugh
Hawaii

Posts: 56
Byhaugh on Feb 26, 2015February 26th, 2015, 9:02 am EST
Crepuscular,
I think I have everything published by Caucci/Nastasi. They are sort of Herod to me. They consistently married a bit of science and scientific approach to fly fishing/tying.

I seem to recall, that in one of their later publications, they clarified the fact that it should have been Drunella. Drc still uses their original identification term, though.
Taxon
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Site Editor
Plano, TX

Posts: 1311
Taxon on Feb 26, 2015February 26th, 2015, 10:46 am EST
Byron-

I think I have everything published by Caucci/Nastasi.


In that case, you might find this useful to print and stuff in the back of your copy of Hatches II.
Best regards,
Roger Rohrbeck
www.FlyfishingEntomology.com
Byhaugh
Hawaii

Posts: 56
Byhaugh on Feb 26, 2015February 26th, 2015, 11:30 am EST
Thanks,
Is this update something they did or was it done by others?
Taxon
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Site Editor
Plano, TX

Posts: 1311
Taxon on Feb 26, 2015February 26th, 2015, 2:03 pm EST
Byron-

Is this update something they did or was it done by others?


Authors (like Caucci & Nastasi) write books which refer to mayfly scientific names. Taxonomists often subsequently make taxonomic revisions to those scientific names. Mayfly Central periodically publishes the latest mayfly taxonomy for North America. And, I provide a service to flyfishers by publishing those taxonomic revisions which affect books in my extensive personal flyfishing entomology library, one example of which is Hatches II by Caucci & Nastasi. Hope this adequately answers your question, but if you (or others) have followup questions, I am always pleased to answer them.
Best regards,
Roger Rohrbeck
www.FlyfishingEntomology.com
Byhaugh
Hawaii

Posts: 56
Byhaugh on Feb 26, 2015February 26th, 2015, 2:28 pm EST
Thanks Taxon. Your response addresses my question.
Crepuscular
Crepuscular's profile picture
Boiling Springs, PA

Posts: 920
Crepuscular on Feb 26, 2015February 26th, 2015, 4:43 pm EST
Crepuscular,
I think I have everything published by Caucci/Nastasi. They are sort of Herod to me. They consistently married a bit of science and scientific approach to fly fishing/tying.

I seem to recall, that in one of their later publications, they clarified the fact that it should have been Drunella. Drc still uses their original identification term, though.


OK. I had to laugh because I was typing out basically the same thing as Roger, and before I posted it and he beat me too it. I'm sorry if offended you by smiling at Roger's post.
Oldredbarn
Oldredbarn's profile picture
Novi, MI

Posts: 2600
Oldredbarn on Mar 2, 2015March 2nd, 2015, 10:59 am EST
I provide a service to flyfishers by publishing those taxonomic revisions which affect books in my extensive personal flyfishing entomology library


Wir danken Ihnen! :)

Spence
"Even when my best efforts fail it's a satisfying challenge, and that, after all, is the essence of fly fishing." -Chauncy Lively

"Envy not the man who lives beside the river, but the man the river flows through." Joseph T Heywood
Taxon
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Site Editor
Plano, TX

Posts: 1311
Taxon on Mar 2, 2015March 2nd, 2015, 2:17 pm EST
Spence-

Wir danken Ihnen! :)


Nix zu danken. :-)
Best regards,
Roger Rohrbeck
www.FlyfishingEntomology.com

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