Header image
Enter a name
Lateral view of a Female Hexagenia limbata (Ephemeridae) (Hex) Mayfly Dun from the Namekagon River in Wisconsin
Hex Mayflies
Hexagenia limbata

The famous nocturnal Hex hatch of the Midwest (and a few other lucky locations) stirs to the surface mythically large brown trout that only touch streamers for the rest of the year.

Dorsal view of a Skwala (Perlodidae) (Large Springfly) Stonefly Nymph from the Yakima River in Washington
This Skwala nymph still has a couple months left to go before hatching, but it's still a good representative of its species, which was extremely abundant in my sample for a stonefly of this size. It's obvious why the Yakima is known for its Skwala hatch.
27" brown trout, my largest ever. It was the sub-dominant fish in its pool. After this, I hooked the bigger one, but I couldn't land it.
Troutnut is a project started in 2003 by salmonid ecologist Jason "Troutnut" Neuswanger to help anglers and fly tyers unabashedly embrace the entomological side of the sport. Learn more about Troutnut or support the project for an enhanced experience here.

Martinlf
Martinlf's profile picture
Moderator
Palmyra PA

Posts: 3047
Martinlf on Jul 13, 2007July 13th, 2007, 11:13 am EDT
After spending a bit of time on the Little Lehigh and Falling Spring Branch recently I determined that the fish on the Little Lehigh are much more civilized. The evidence? Fish on the Little Lehigh often rise out in the open, allowing standard casts, while fish on Falling Spring rise under trees, bushes, and other obstructions, forcing the fly fisher to cast sidearm, backhand, and other awkward and fly tangling ways. In addition, the respectful fish on the Little Lehigh often allow an angler to stand and address them, while the fish on Falling Spring require anglers to get on their knees and even crawl before even considering accepting an offering. The respective homes of these fish provide even more proof. The fish on the Little Lehigh have servants to mow vast swaths of grass near their homes and the landscape's whole feel is of domestic neatness. The fish of Falling Spring, on the other hand, live amid weeds, downed trees, and tangles of cress. The result: one can always find visitors to the Little Lehigh on hand, fishing, or talking, or just sitting and enjoying the beauty of the stream on benches provided for their ease and comfort. Falling Spring, on the other hand, is shunned by all but the few, who are forced to stand, if they happen to meet, while they discuss why the fish are so lacking in manners.
"He spread them a yard and a half. 'And every one that got away is this big.'"

--Fred Chappell
GONZO
Site Editor
"Bear Swamp," PA

Posts: 1681
GONZO on Jul 15, 2007July 15th, 2007, 6:57 am EDT
Louis,
I share your general observations about fishing LL vs. FSB, but much of that can probably be attributed either to the ratio of stocked to wild fish or to the relative size of the streams. (Cedar Creek, a small trib of the LL, often fishes more like FSB.)

Still, even on wild trout waters of nearly identical size, amazing differences can exist from the standpoint of approach. Two favorite Pocono tribs contain little flat pools of about the same length/width/depth. On one, I can stand in full view and catch numbers of wild trout (42 on the best day) from the same hole. (Although he wasn't there to witness the numbers, Shawn can at least verify that this is a possibility.) On the other, a single cast, even from a hidden position, often causes every trout in the pool to bounce around like they were in some aquatic pinball game. In these two little tribs, the most significant difference is the species of wild trout--brookies in the former vs. browns in the latter.
JOHNW
JOHNW's profile picture
Chambersburg, PA

Posts: 452
JOHNW on Jul 16, 2007July 16th, 2007, 11:51 am EDT
Louis,
At least the FSB trout have the courtesy of letting you see tham as they flee in terror, providing the opportunity to "mark their lies" for later trips. The same can't be said for another Cumberland Valley stream full of PHD level trout.
As for me the FSB trout behaves exactly how a wild meadow spring creek trout should. "LL" trout on the other hand are an abomination, although I'm not above fishing for them.
Gonzo,
Shhhhhhh about Cedar!;0 Next thing you'll be giving directions to Trout Run.

To all,
I will be in the Lehigh Valley on the weekend of 7-28 and need a fishing fix badly. I would love to meet up with anyone who is interested. The only caveat being the Little Lehigh is off the list of options, I just don't want to fight for space to fish. I grew up in the Valley so I am fairly familiar with the water and have a few options for wild trout or down right difficult hold overs.
JW
"old habits are hard to kill once you have gray in your beard" -Old Red Barn
Martinlf
Martinlf's profile picture
Moderator
Palmyra PA

Posts: 3047
Martinlf on Jul 17, 2007July 17th, 2007, 4:17 am EDT
John, another helpful tip. Thank you again. I hope someone is up that way the end of July. It appears I'll be holding closer to home unless I think up some kind of spouse scam.

Casey, I should add that it appears that your stay in the land of Harry Potter has not helped your prognosticative skills. All the spinners I saw on Falling Spring had hackle wings, not a poly wing spinner in the bunch. But, I suppose, that may have just been the prevailing conditions that day. Do let us know how the trout are behaving in Jolly Old England.
"He spread them a yard and a half. 'And every one that got away is this big.'"

--Fred Chappell
GONZO
Site Editor
"Bear Swamp," PA

Posts: 1681
GONZO on Jul 17, 2007July 17th, 2007, 6:52 am EDT
JW,

Sorry about the mention of CC, but after Meck, Landis, and Armstrong all wrote about it, that particular cat seems mostly out of the bag. I do appreciate your sensitivity though, I know how painful it was to find some of my "secret" favorites publicized by the "kiss-and-tell" folks.
JOHNW
JOHNW's profile picture
Chambersburg, PA

Posts: 452
JOHNW on Jul 17, 2007July 17th, 2007, 9:50 am EDT
Gonzo,
The great thing about streams like Trout Run or CC is they very rarely draw attention. I find most folks don't care for a stream that tiny or urban.
No real offense taken. I realize that there aren't any real secrets anymore but I do like my delusions.
JW
"old habits are hard to kill once you have gray in your beard" -Old Red Barn

Quick Reply

Related Discussions

Topic
Replies
Last Reply
2
Sep 25, 2013
by Stokes
2
Oct 31, 2015
by Martinlf
2
Jul 29, 2007
by JOHNW
Troutnut.com is copyright © 2004-2024 (email Jason). privacy policy