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Lateral view of a Male Baetis (Baetidae) (Blue-Winged Olive) Mayfly Dun from Mystery Creek #43 in New York
Blue-winged Olives
Baetis

Tiny Baetis mayflies are perhaps the most commonly encountered and imitated by anglers on all American trout streams due to their great abundance, widespread distribution, and trout-friendly emergence habits.

Dorsal view of a Limnephilidae (Giant Sedges) Caddisfly Larva from the Yakima River in Washington
This specimen resembled several others of around the same size and perhaps the same species, which were pretty common in my February sample from the upper Yakima. Unfortunately, I misplaced the specimen before I could get it under a microscope for a definitive ID.
27" brown trout, my largest ever. It was the sub-dominant fish in its pool. After this, I hooked the bigger one, but I couldn't land it.
Troutnut is a project started in 2003 by salmonid ecologist Jason "Troutnut" Neuswanger to help anglers and fly tyers unabashedly embrace the entomological side of the sport. Learn more about Troutnut or support the project for an enhanced experience here.

GONZO
Site Editor
"Bear Swamp," PA

Posts: 1681
GONZO on Jul 19, 2007July 19th, 2007, 5:34 am EDT
So maybe that explains the low poster/member ratio...

Maybe, James, but I, for one, hope that all the "lurkers" out there would at least feel comfortable enough to ask questions. Without questions to try to answer, many of the regular posters just end up teasing each other in bizzare and arcane ways. ;) Really, other than the great group of professional bug and fish people who post here, we're all just regular Joes who want to learn as much as we can about the sport and the creatures we love.
Martinlf
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Moderator
Palmyra PA

Posts: 3047
Martinlf on Jul 19, 2007July 19th, 2007, 6:40 am EDT
All I can say is if any of the non-posting viewers think I know much of anything, they just need to join me fishing to be quickly and thoroughly disabused of that idea. Now, I completely deny all responsibility for any odd or arcane teasing that may have appeared on Jason's site. Gonzo must be thinking of someone else. But what I will emphasize is that everyone will find themselves welcome here, and they will find their questions and ideas treated with respect, at least until they are well enough known to take a bit of teasing. So let us have your .02, as my friend JohnW says.
"He spread them a yard and a half. 'And every one that got away is this big.'"

--Fred Chappell
CaseyP
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Arlington, VA/ Mercersburg, PA

Posts: 653
CaseyP on Jul 21, 2007July 21st, 2007, 3:42 am EDT
the following is an example of why we check this site out all day long. who couldn't want to check out the latest after you read the post by "martinl":

Now that many of us are in tying mode, I thought it might be interesting to start a favorite fly "thread." What I envisioned was not a series of comments on beloved standard ties, but rather, for those who are willing, descriptions of unusual but effective flies, especially ones that show tough fish something new. I'm starting with a fly I've kept to myself and a few friends for years, but, given Gonzo's generosity, feel a bit silly not sharing now.


the polite responses to posters as they joined this thread were sure encouraging to this tyro! and if you're new and missed this nifty exchange, check out Favorite Flies in Fly Tying.
"You can observe a lot by watching." Yogi Berra
Martinlf
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Moderator
Palmyra PA

Posts: 3047
Martinlf on Jul 21, 2007July 21st, 2007, 4:25 am EDT
Casey's right to encourage new viewers to take a look at some of the past threads. I return to them myself from time to time to review a fly recipe, a hatch issue, or a specific identification tip.
"He spread them a yard and a half. 'And every one that got away is this big.'"

--Fred Chappell
Troutnut
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Administrator
Bellevue, WA

Posts: 2758
Troutnut on Jul 21, 2007July 21st, 2007, 7:13 pm EDT
All I can say is if any of the non-posting viewers think I know much of anything, they just need to join me fishing to be quickly and thoroughly disabused of that idea.


If that's the case I may need to fish with you again. The first time, I was left with the impression that you're a thoroughly competent angler. If any buffoonery took place, it was with considerable stealth and probably took place while I had my back turned. You will have to try a little harder than that to disabuse anyone of the notion that you know what you're doing.
Jason Neuswanger, Ph.D.
Troutnut and salmonid ecologist

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