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Artistic view of a Male Pteronarcys californica (Pteronarcyidae) (Giant Salmonfly) Stonefly Adult from the Gallatin River in Montana
Salmonflies
Pteronarcys californica

The giant Salmonflies of the Western mountains are legendary for their proclivity to elicit consistent dry-fly action and ferocious strikes.

Dorsal view of a Amphizoa (Amphizoidae) Beetle Larva from Sears Creek in Washington
This is the first of it's family I've seen, collected from a tiny, fishless stream in the Cascades. The three species of this genus all live in the Northwest and are predators that primarily eat stonefly nymphs Merritt R.W., Cummins, K.W., and Berg, M.B. (2019).
27" brown trout, my largest ever. It was the sub-dominant fish in its pool. After this, I hooked the bigger one, but I couldn't land it.
Troutnut is a project started in 2003 by salmonid ecologist Jason "Troutnut" Neuswanger to help anglers and fly tyers unabashedly embrace the entomological side of the sport. Learn more about Troutnut or support the project for an enhanced experience here.

Lastchance has attached this picture to aid in identification. The message is below.
Lastchance
Portage, PA

Posts: 437
Lastchance on Oct 13, 2014October 13th, 2014, 11:58 am EDT
I found this in The Little Juniata. Is it next year's Cahill? It looks like a stenonema to my untrained eyes. I guess I need more detail in the photo.
Millcreek
Healdsburg, CA

Posts: 344
Millcreek on Oct 13, 2014October 13th, 2014, 2:05 pm EDT
Bruce-
It looks like a stenonema to my untrained eyes.

Hard to tell for sure from your pic but it looks like it probably is. Or possibly Maccaffertium.

Link for Stenonema:http://bugguide.net/node/view/250236/bgimage

Link for Maccaffertium:http://bugguide.net/node/view/532697/bgimage
"If we knew what it was we were doing, it would not be called research, would it?"
-Albert Einstein
Timman
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Banned
white deer pike PA

Posts: 10
Timman on Oct 13, 2014October 13th, 2014, 5:33 pm EDT
Maccaffertium pulchellum
Fake account made by Brookyman (who was banned for threatening another user)
Taxon
Taxon's profile picture
Site Editor
Plano, TX

Posts: 1311
Taxon on Oct 13, 2014October 13th, 2014, 7:48 pm EDT
Bruce-



Next time, you might want to photograph a mayfly nymph in one of these with enough water in it to fully cover the nymph. It makes a world of difference.
Best regards,
Roger Rohrbeck
www.FlyfishingEntomology.com
Roguerat
Roguerat's profile picture
Posts: 456
Roguerat on Oct 18, 2014October 18th, 2014, 7:59 am EDT
Roger-

that advice on placing nymphs in water is one of the neatest tips I've heard on aquatic insect photography. The one and only time I tried to shoot pictures (of Drunella C. nymphs) they'd gotten pretty well desiccated by the time I got things set up...and if kept wet they can be returned to the river if need be.

Really wondering this one, how many Troutnuts are 'real' Entomologists, Aquatic Biologists or professionals of some type? Gotta be more than a few from what I've read over the couple years I've been around.

Things are pretty slow in W. MI, waiting for Steelhead to make a real appearance- its been ones and twos here and there.

Roguerat aka Mark N.

I Peter 5:7 'Cast your cares upon Him...'
Millcreek
Healdsburg, CA

Posts: 344
Millcreek on Oct 18, 2014October 18th, 2014, 9:15 am EDT
Roguerat-
Really wondering this one, how many Troutnuts are 'real' Entomologists, Aquatic Biologists or professionals of some type? Gotta be more than a few from what I've read over the couple years I've been around.

Well, while I certainly enjoy studying and photographing aquatic insects I dropped out of school at the end of seventh grade and never looked back. I try not to let it get in the way of continuing to learn.
"If we knew what it was we were doing, it would not be called research, would it?"
-Albert Einstein
Taxon
Taxon's profile picture
Site Editor
Plano, TX

Posts: 1311
Taxon on Oct 18, 2014October 18th, 2014, 9:52 am EDT
Thanks, Roguerat.

Expanding on your comment just a bit, the whitish background provided by the inside of a jar lid makes it far easier to discern identifying characters of a contrastingly darker mayfly nymph, and fully covering it with water allows appendages like gills and tails to assume their natural positions, as opposed to sticking to its body.

As to wondering how many Troutnuts are aquatic entomologists, etc., I am aware of several regular contributors here who are PhD entomologists, and are considered experts in their respective specialties, and suspect there may be numerous others with similar (or somewhat lesser) credentials.
Best regards,
Roger Rohrbeck
www.FlyfishingEntomology.com
Crepuscular
Crepuscular's profile picture
Boiling Springs, PA

Posts: 920
Crepuscular on Oct 19, 2014October 19th, 2014, 4:35 pm EDT
Really wondering this one, how many Troutnuts are 'real' Entomologists, Aquatic Biologists or professionals of some type? Gotta be more than a few from what I've read over the couple years I've been around.


Well I certainly do not have the academic credentials of others here. But I have worked as an aquatic biologist for 18 yrs. some
of that time as a taxonomist some as an aquatic biologist doing everything from grant writing to streambank restoration to water quality monitoring which involved chemical, biological and habitat sampling and now unfortunately I mostly mange people that do that kind of work. Every now and then I subject them to me going with them in the field. And I do QC/QA on their bug identifications. Oh yeah, I also guide fly fisherman...
Oldredbarn
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Novi, MI

Posts: 2600
Oldredbarn on Oct 20, 2014October 20th, 2014, 8:42 am EDT
Every now and then I subject them to me going with them in the field.


Those poor souls! :) I've been "out in the field" with you and it almost got me killed...At least, I almost had to sleep in the car. :)

From all the pics you post etc, I don't think you even know where your office really is.

Spence (the survivor of the Coburn storm of April 2013)...the beers after were nice.
"Even when my best efforts fail it's a satisfying challenge, and that, after all, is the essence of fly fishing." -Chauncy Lively

"Envy not the man who lives beside the river, but the man the river flows through." Joseph T Heywood
Jmd123
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Oscoda, MI

Posts: 2474
Jmd123 on Oct 22, 2014October 22nd, 2014, 4:24 pm EDT
Eric, your career sounds similar to mine, although I have managed to stay out in the field and avoided "operating a desk" except for reports I write on my own field work. I do have a MS in entomology but have not done nearly as much work with that degree as with my BS in botany (yes, this explains all the wildflower pics), though I have had a few benthic macroinvert projects recently including one this summer. I did almost get a PhD in aquatic entomology - I got very interested in the whole benthics as biological indicators thing and even did a substantial amount of midge larval ID (to genus at least) - but I had a horrible advisor who basically gave me no help or guidance, or financial assistance, and ended up getting really turned off by academia. So, I went into consulting, and now teaching as well. I do a fair amount of aquatics work but more in the terrestrial realm, including entomology too...

Jonathon
No matter how big the one you just caught is, there's always a bigger one out there somewhere...

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