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Lateral view of a Female Hexagenia limbata (Ephemeridae) (Hex) Mayfly Dun from the Namekagon River in Wisconsin
Hex Mayflies
Hexagenia limbata

The famous nocturnal Hex hatch of the Midwest (and a few other lucky locations) stirs to the surface mythically large brown trout that only touch streamers for the rest of the year.

Dorsal view of a Limnephilidae (Giant Sedges) Caddisfly Larva from the Yakima River in Washington
This specimen resembled several others of around the same size and perhaps the same species, which were pretty common in my February sample from the upper Yakima. Unfortunately, I misplaced the specimen before I could get it under a microscope for a definitive ID.
27" brown trout, my largest ever. It was the sub-dominant fish in its pool. After this, I hooked the bigger one, but I couldn't land it.
Troutnut is a project started in 2003 by salmonid ecologist Jason "Troutnut" Neuswanger to help anglers and fly tyers unabashedly embrace the entomological side of the sport. Learn more about Troutnut or support the project for an enhanced experience here.

CalebBoyle has attached these 2 pictures to aid in identification. The message is below.
CalebBoyle
Charlotte, NC

Posts: 11
CalebBoyle on Mar 30, 2007March 30th, 2007, 2:53 pm EDT
Hello all,
This is my first time posting and I must agree with everyoen, this is the best aquatic entomology site by far for the flyfisherman. I have a mayfly hatch from my aquarium that is quite unique in its coloration. I'm pretty sure its a maccaffertium species, but I'm not sure which one. Anyone have some ideas?
Konchu
Konchu's profile picture
Site Editor
Indiana

Posts: 498
Konchu on Mar 30, 2007March 30th, 2007, 3:01 pm EDT
or Stenacron??? I just moved and all my notes/books are tucked away in boxes, but that is my initial guess based on your photos. Nice pictures, by the way.
CalebBoyle
Charlotte, NC

Posts: 11
CalebBoyle on Mar 30, 2007March 30th, 2007, 3:07 pm EDT
It Could be. Is there a good key to look for in the s to seperate the stenacron and Macc? The only thing I can find in my book by Cormier and Knopp, is the shape of the gills.
Konchu
Konchu's profile picture
Site Editor
Indiana

Posts: 498
Konchu on Mar 30, 2007March 30th, 2007, 3:12 pm EDT
Stenacron has the pointy gills

Stenonema & M. don't

That's what I use for starters
Troutnut
Troutnut's profile picture
Administrator
Bellevue, WA

Posts: 2758
Troutnut on Mar 30, 2007March 30th, 2007, 3:16 pm EDT
I think that prominent black spot on the wing means it's Stenacron.

I have no clue how to tell one Stenacron species from another, but the one most commonly referenced is Stenacron interpunctatum, so that's as good a guess as any.
Jason Neuswanger, Ph.D.
Troutnut and salmonid ecologist
CalebBoyle
Charlotte, NC

Posts: 11
CalebBoyle on Mar 30, 2007March 30th, 2007, 3:18 pm EDT
Cool, I didn't know about the black dot thing. It looks alot like your stenacron species Jason, except mine is a little more pink in the abdomen.
Konchu
Konchu's profile picture
Site Editor
Indiana

Posts: 498
Konchu on Mar 31, 2007March 31st, 2007, 1:44 am EDT
The pink is probably the eggs.
GONZO
Site Editor
"Bear Swamp," PA

Posts: 1681
GONZO on Mar 31, 2007March 31st, 2007, 6:53 am EDT
CalebBoyle-

Beautiful female dun--nice photos. The dark area in the third space on the wing (between R1 and R2) is usually a good character for distinguishing between Stenacron and Maccaffertium or Stenonema adults. It is expressed either as a black dot, as in your specimen, or, more commonly, as a dark patch that connects or nearly connects two or three crossveins.

Distinguishing the Stenacron species as adults is pretty tough and usually requires a male specimen (for penes differentiation) or rearing adults from identified larvae. This specimen lacks the dark spiracular marks (spiracles are the little breathing holes along the abdomen) and the dark streak below the wing base that one often sees on Stenacron interpunctatum. But, as far as I know, these may not be definitive characters.

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