Header image
Enter a name
Lateral view of a Male Baetis (Baetidae) (Blue-Winged Olive) Mayfly Dun from Mystery Creek #43 in New York
Blue-winged Olives
Baetis

Tiny Baetis mayflies are perhaps the most commonly encountered and imitated by anglers on all American trout streams due to their great abundance, widespread distribution, and trout-friendly emergence habits.

Dorsal view of a Pycnopsyche guttifera (Limnephilidae) (Great Autumn Brown Sedge) Caddisfly Larva from the Yakima River in Washington
This specimen appears to be of the same species as this one collected in the same spot two months earlier. The identification of both is tentative. This one suffered some physical damage before being photographed, too, so the colors aren't totally natural. I was mostly photographing it to test out some new camera setting idea, which worked really well for a couple of closeups.
27" brown trout, my largest ever. It was the sub-dominant fish in its pool. After this, I hooked the bigger one, but I couldn't land it.
Troutnut is a project started in 2003 by salmonid ecologist Jason "Troutnut" Neuswanger to help anglers and fly tyers unabashedly embrace the entomological side of the sport. Learn more about Troutnut or support the project for an enhanced experience here.

Acroneuria carolinensis (Golden Stone) Stonefly Nymph Pictures

This stonefly was collected from unknown in Wisconsin on February 7th, 2004 and added to Troutnut.com by Troutnut on January 25th, 2006.

Discussions of this Nymph

Acroneuria specimen moved from genus to species level
Posted by Entoman on Mar 11, 2012
Last reply on Mar 11, 2012 by Entoman
The head markings better match up with A. carolinensis (pronounced unbroken W, thick tapering occipital band). Another clue is the femora maculation. A. abnormis usually has either dark brown legs without obvious maculation or longitudinal dark stripes as opposed to the pale bands or blotches evidenced on this specimen. While a dark dorsal habitus is usually associated with abnormis, it is not a very dependable character. The other common species (lycorias) has head and leg markings that can look quite similar, but it has anal gills and usually a pale center with dark margins on the terga.

A. carolinensis
http://bugguide.net/node/view/515177

A. abnormis
http://www.troutnut.com/specimen/446

Start a Discussion of Nymph

Acroneuria carolinensis (Golden Stone) Stonefly Nymph Pictures

Collection details
Location: unknown, Wisconsin
Date: February 7th, 2004
Added to site: January 25th, 2006
Author: Troutnut
Troutnut.com is copyright © 2004-2024 (email Jason). privacy policy