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Lateral view of a Female Hexagenia limbata (Ephemeridae) (Hex) Mayfly Dun from the Namekagon River in Wisconsin
Hex Mayflies
Hexagenia limbata

The famous nocturnal Hex hatch of the Midwest (and a few other lucky locations) stirs to the surface mythically large brown trout that only touch streamers for the rest of the year.

Dorsal view of a Holocentropus (Polycentropodidae) Caddisfly Larva from the Yakima River in Washington
This one seems to tentatively key to Holocentropus, although I can't make out the anal spines in Couplet 7 of the Key to Genera of Polycentropodidae Larvae nor the dark bands in Couplet 4 of the Key to Genera of Polycentropodidae Larvae, making me wonder if I went wrong somewhere in keying it out. I don't see where that could have happened, though. It might also be that it's a very immature larva and doesn't possess all the identifying characteristics in the key yet. If Holocentropus is correct, then Holocentropus flavus and Holocentropus interruptus are the two likely possibilities based on range, but I was not able to find a description of their larvae.
27" brown trout, my largest ever. It was the sub-dominant fish in its pool. After this, I hooked the bigger one, but I couldn't land it.
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Crepuscular
Crepuscular's profile picture
Boiling Springs, PA

Posts: 920
Crepuscular on May 7, 2014May 7th, 2014, 5:46 pm EDT
Found a couple of caddisflies on a rock.







Crepuscular
Crepuscular's profile picture
Boiling Springs, PA

Posts: 920
Crepuscular on May 7, 2014May 7th, 2014, 6:28 pm EDT
I have never seen that many so well packed in.


That's what grannoms do. Maybe Creno can tell us why. I managed to grab 10 or 15 at once and the ones that didn't get away were all females but I don't know if that was just random. I did notice some crawling down the rock and then underwater. I'm assuming to lay eggs?
Crepuscular
Crepuscular's profile picture
Boiling Springs, PA

Posts: 920
Crepuscular on May 8, 2014May 8th, 2014, 2:37 am EDT
Did this just happen ???


The Brachycentrus sp. emergences here (South Central PA) start in the beginning of April.
Oldredbarn
Oldredbarn's profile picture
Novi, MI

Posts: 2600
Oldredbarn on May 8, 2014May 8th, 2014, 7:57 pm EDT
Nice Eric...With us being behind you a bit weather wise, what do you think I'm tying up? :)

Spence
"Even when my best efforts fail it's a satisfying challenge, and that, after all, is the essence of fly fishing." -Chauncy Lively

"Envy not the man who lives beside the river, but the man the river flows through." Joseph T Heywood
Creno
Grants Pass, OR

Posts: 302
Creno on May 9, 2014May 9th, 2014, 9:24 am EDT
Sorry - I have never seen that and cannot find any literature that addresses it. Some Brachycentrus are known to pupate in masses, and males of some species often have very brief emergence periods, even a day or two. But that doesn't really explain why all the males would get together in a mass. They should be out wandering the neighborhood. Many caddis use pheromones to get the adults together. But if that mass was all females that wouldn't make much sense either. I am at a loss but great pics. May I use them to show other caddis folks? Maybe some one else has an idea what is going on.
Crepuscular
Crepuscular's profile picture
Boiling Springs, PA

Posts: 920
Crepuscular on May 10, 2014May 10th, 2014, 9:39 am EDT
May I use them to show other caddis folks? Maybe some one else has an idea what is going on.


Of course!

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