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Lateral view of a Male Baetis (Baetidae) (Blue-Winged Olive) Mayfly Dun from Mystery Creek #43 in New York
Blue-winged Olives
Baetis

Tiny Baetis mayflies are perhaps the most commonly encountered and imitated by anglers on all American trout streams due to their great abundance, widespread distribution, and trout-friendly emergence habits.

27" brown trout, my largest ever. It was the sub-dominant fish in its pool. After this, I hooked the bigger one, but I couldn't land it.
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Sayfu
Posts: 560
Sayfu on Aug 18, 2011August 18th, 2011, 8:03 am EDT
I'm on rivers a lot, and floated down, and set up on a big gravel bar. In the shallows was a bug that could move fast on the surface...long legs, and antennae I believe. It was large, say a size #6 and had good sized, flat, dark down wings over its body like a stonefly. I'd guess a type of cranefly? Is that enough info for one of you to take a shot at identifying it?
Taxon
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Plano, TX

Posts: 1311
Taxon on Aug 18, 2011August 18th, 2011, 9:36 am EDT


Water Strider - an aquatic true bug (hemipteran)
Best regards,
Roger Rohrbeck
www.FlyfishingEntomology.com
Adirman
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Monticello, NY

Posts: 479
Adirman on Aug 18, 2011August 18th, 2011, 3:15 pm EDT
Yeah, I see those striders all the time but its been my experience that the trout pretty much ignore 'em. I'm not saying that a pattern imitating 'em wouldn't be productive from time-to-time but I've watched trout rise to this or that and move right by sriders, completely ignoring them!! What's up w/ that?
Taxon
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Taxon on Aug 18, 2011August 18th, 2011, 4:07 pm EDT
Adirman-

There are several reasons that I've heard, one that they don't taste good, and another that they are so adept at dodging fish, that the fish learn to simply avoid them.
Best regards,
Roger Rohrbeck
www.FlyfishingEntomology.com
Adirman
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Monticello, NY

Posts: 479
Adirman on Aug 18, 2011August 18th, 2011, 4:28 pm EDT
huh!! Interesting! Makes sense to me. Do you remember where you got this info? I don't doubt what you say would just like to learn more about this if possible.

thanks,

Adirman
Taxon
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Taxon on Aug 18, 2011August 18th, 2011, 8:24 pm EDT
Adirman-

The following is a quote from The Gerridae or Water Striders of Oregon and Washington (Hemiptera:Heteroptera) by Gary M. Stonedahl and John D. Lattin, April 1982, and appears on page 3/36 of the linked document.

Water striders are very conspicuous and may occur in large groups, but they are rarely eaten by other aquatic animals such as fish. Scent gland secretions are believed to be responsible for this apparent immunity.


As to the second (possible) reason I listed for their seldom being targeted by fish, that being their skill at avoiding a pursuing fish, I can only tell you that I have only read it once, and that was many years ago, but the story had a sufficient ring of credibility, that I remembered and repeated it here.

It is also said that fish only feed on water striders when the the fish are starving, and water striders are the only available food source.
Best regards,
Roger Rohrbeck
www.FlyfishingEntomology.com
Sayfu
Posts: 560
Sayfu on Aug 19, 2011August 19th, 2011, 4:31 am EDT

You got it! Don't think I've ever seen one of those. I had the feeling that fish wouldn't be interested in them. Thanks for the response. From now through Sept. we get Classenia (sp?) the Fall golden stone on the SF of the Snake in our Canyon area. Interesting insect. The males have short wings, and scurry around on the island rocks, and when they get blown in the water they scurry across the top not being able to fly very well. A chernobyl, in a brown underbody fished dead drifted and then at the end of the drift you raise your rod tip, and allow the fly to skate. You can get some violent strikes on browns, or cutthroats. They call them mutants, but the females are large stones that can fly well. It is only the males that are mutant.

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