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Lateral view of a Male Baetis (Baetidae) (Blue-Winged Olive) Mayfly Dun from Mystery Creek #43 in New York
Blue-winged Olives
Baetis

Tiny Baetis mayflies are perhaps the most commonly encountered and imitated by anglers on all American trout streams due to their great abundance, widespread distribution, and trout-friendly emergence habits.

Dorsal view of a Neoleptophlebia (Leptophlebiidae) Mayfly Nymph from the Yakima River in Washington
Some characteristics from the microscope images for the tentative species id: The postero-lateral projections are found only on segment 9, not segment 8. Based on the key in Jacobus et al. (2014), it appears to key to Neoleptophlebia adoptiva or Neoleptophlebia heteronea, same as this specimen with pretty different abdominal markings. However, distinguishing between those calls for comparing the lengths of the second and third segment of the labial palp, and this one (like the other one) only seems to have two segments. So I'm stuck on them both. It's likely that the fact that they're immature nymphs stymies identification in some important way.
27" brown trout, my largest ever. It was the sub-dominant fish in its pool. After this, I hooked the bigger one, but I couldn't land it.
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Kcnal has attached this picture to aid in identification. The message is below.
Kcnal
Alabama

Posts: 6
Kcnal on Jul 19, 2010July 19th, 2010, 12:56 pm EDT
As you will tell I'm an absolute beginner in learning about some of the insects founds on the waterway. I have some material coming to cross reference, but wanted to put these out there for any help and comments...
Dryfly
rochester mn

Posts: 133
Dryfly on Jul 19, 2010July 19th, 2010, 2:27 pm EDT
Its a purdy damselfly.
Kcnal
Alabama

Posts: 6
Kcnal on Jul 19, 2010July 19th, 2010, 3:30 pm EDT
I know there are an amazing number of colors, etc...

I have some pictures taken from the same location at the same time with a varying array of these in terrific, but different colors.

Does anyone know if the colors indicate a different (family, for lack of a more educated term)?

There are some just amazing electric greens and varying colors.
Konchu
Konchu's profile picture
Site Editor
Indiana

Posts: 498
Konchu on Jul 19, 2010July 19th, 2010, 3:35 pm EDT
Sometimes, the colors are different just between the males and females of the same species, especially with the showy damselflies.
GONZO
Site Editor
"Bear Swamp," PA

Posts: 1681
GONZO on Jul 19, 2010July 19th, 2010, 4:00 pm EDT
This looks like one of the Broadwinged Damselflies known as Jewelwings, perhaps a female Ebony Jewelwing (Calopteryx maculata).
Kcnal
Alabama

Posts: 6
Kcnal on Jul 19, 2010July 19th, 2010, 4:10 pm EDT
Thanks for all the replies. I understand it takes time and research..

Do you have a link or other material you can recommend?
GONZO
Site Editor
"Bear Swamp," PA

Posts: 1681
GONZO on Jul 19, 2010July 19th, 2010, 4:54 pm EDT
Do you have a link or other material you can recommend?

For damselflies/dragonflies, try this one:
http://www.odonatacentral.org/index.php/PageAction.get/name/HomePage
Jmd123
Jmd123's profile picture
Oscoda, MI

Posts: 2474
Jmd123 on Jul 19, 2010July 19th, 2010, 6:14 pm EDT
That's a female Calopteryx maculata for sure. I see them all the time here in southern Michigan, on just about every stream. The white spots on the wings are characteristic for the female of the species. The bright metallic green ones with smoky black wings that you are seeing are the males of this same species. Yep, they're downright gorgeous!

My entomology background includes a MS from Michigan State, 1991. Not that it helps me get much work, but it sure was interesting, and still is. I think of insects, not just aquatic ones, as little tiny friends and living jewels that seldom fail to delight me - unless, of course, they are trying to suck my blood...

Jonathon
No matter how big the one you just caught is, there's always a bigger one out there somewhere...

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