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Lateral view of a Male Baetis (Baetidae) (Blue-Winged Olive) Mayfly Dun from Mystery Creek #43 in New York
Blue-winged Olives
Baetis

Tiny Baetis mayflies are perhaps the most commonly encountered and imitated by anglers on all American trout streams due to their great abundance, widespread distribution, and trout-friendly emergence habits.

Dorsal view of a Grammotaulius betteni (Limnephilidae) (Northern Caddisfly) Caddisfly Larva from the Yakima River in Washington
This is a striking caddis larva with an interesting color pattern on the head. Here are some characteristics I was able to see under the microscope, but could not easily expose for a picture:
- The prosternal horn is present.
- The mandible is clearly toothed, not formed into a uniform scraper blade.
- The seems to be only 2 major setae on the ventral edge of the hind femur.
- Chloride epithelia seem to be absent from the dorsal side of any abdominal segments.
Based on these characteristics and the ones more easily visible from the pictures, this seems to be Grammotaulius. The key's description of the case is spot-on: "Case cylindrical, made of longitudinally arranged sedge or similar leaves," as is the description of the markings on the head, "Dorsum of head light brownish yellow with numerous discrete, small, dark spots." The spot pattern on the head is a very good match to figure 19.312 of Merritt R.W., Cummins, K.W., and Berg, M.B. (2019). The species ID is based on Grammotaulius betteni being the only species of this genus known in Washington state.
27" brown trout, my largest ever. It was the sub-dominant fish in its pool. After this, I hooked the bigger one, but I couldn't land it.
Troutnut is a project started in 2003 by salmonid ecologist Jason "Troutnut" Neuswanger to help anglers and fly tyers unabashedly embrace the entomological side of the sport. Learn more about Troutnut or support the project for an enhanced experience here.

Sunppy has attached this picture to aid in identification. The message is below.
Sunppy
Posts: 4
Sunppy on Dec 22, 2013December 22nd, 2013, 4:57 pm EST
Hello, I am new to this forum.

I am recently seeing a bug in my house that I don't know where it is coming from. I have killed at least 10 in the past month, every time I clean or do anything, I find them at random times.
They are in the living room, bathroom, and kitchen... I always find one at a time, and never in a group.

They don't fly, they have long "antennas". It is dark brown and has stripes on the body.

I attached a picture. Sorry it is not very clear, it keeps moving.

Can anyone tell me what type of bug this is? And how to get rid of them without calling an exterminator?
I live in South Florida in an apartment. I have no pets, and have a relatively clean house, except I keep seeing these bugs.


Thanks in advance!
Crepuscular
Crepuscular's profile picture
Boiling Springs, PA

Posts: 920
Crepuscular on Dec 22, 2013December 22nd, 2013, 5:06 pm EST
Although the photo is not the best, it looks like a roach.
Sunppy
Posts: 4
Sunppy on Dec 22, 2013December 22nd, 2013, 5:28 pm EST
I don't think it is a roach because it is only about 1.5 cm long and it doesnt look like it has wings.
Sunppy
Posts: 4
Sunppy on Dec 22, 2013December 22nd, 2013, 5:37 pm EST
Brookyman, Thank You very much for your help! I will try to get rid of them before they grow any bigger.

This is not a great way to spend my holidays.
Thanks Again!
Sunppy
Posts: 4
Sunppy on Dec 22, 2013December 22nd, 2013, 6:29 pm EST
Thanks, I will be buying bait and spray in a few days to try and get rid of them.

The ducktape idea seems like it might work too! :)
Feathers5
Posts: 287
Feathers5 on Dec 23, 2013December 23rd, 2013, 4:40 am EST
That's called a "Cleaning Bug." Whenever you don't clean, you get 'em. They are part of the Cleanus Dirtus family. They are easy to identify. Most will be carrying a slice of your lunchmeat in their mouthus swallowmus.

Merry Christmas!
CaseyP
CaseyP's profile picture
Arlington, VA/ Mercersburg, PA

Posts: 653
CaseyP on Dec 23, 2013December 23rd, 2013, 4:52 am EST
roaches are hard to get rid of, especially in hot climates, but we did manage it in Indonesia, using a bait containing Boric Acid.

be careful of this stuff! put it out of the way of children and pets, like at the back of base cabinets in the kitchen and bath, especially under the sinks, where the bugs like to be in any case. keep the cabinets closed except to take out what you need. sweep up the dead bugs every morning. the ones you don't see will take the dust back to their buddies and eventually the whole colony is wiped out. they'll be back, but by then you know what to do.

we mixed Boric Acid with powdered milk 1:1. a teaspoon or so in the back corners of every base cabinet (away from the pots and pans and toilet paper) did the trick.
"You can observe a lot by watching." Yogi Berra
Lastchance
Portage, PA

Posts: 437
Lastchance on Dec 23, 2013December 23rd, 2013, 11:45 am EST
Hello, I am new to this forum.

I am recently seeing a bug in my house that I don't know where it is coming from. I have killed at least 10 in the past month, every time I clean or do anything, I find them at random times.
They are in the living room, bathroom, and kitchen... I always find one at a time, and never in a group.

They don't fly, they have long "antennas". It is dark brown and has stripes on the body.

I attached a picture. Sorry it is not very clear, it keeps moving.

Can anyone tell me what type of bug this is? And how to get rid of them without calling an exterminator?
I live in South Florida in an apartment. I have no pets, and have a relatively clean house, except I keep seeing these bugs.


Thanks in advance!


Sunppy! Hello and welcome to the forum. I got to thinking my joking might have been offensive to you being that you're new. I meant no harm. On behalf of the people of my planet, and myself, I'd like to express my sincere apology. I'd like to, but I can't. Nah, I was kidding again.
Seriously, don't be offended. I was just cutting up. Oops. I ended a sentence in a preposition.
JOHNW
JOHNW's profile picture
Chambersburg, PA

Posts: 452
JOHNW on Dec 23, 2013December 23rd, 2013, 12:33 pm EST
And now you know why he is called LAst Chance!
"old habits are hard to kill once you have gray in your beard" -Old Red Barn
Martinlf
Martinlf's profile picture
Moderator
Palmyra PA

Posts: 3047
Martinlf on Dec 25, 2013December 25th, 2013, 6:39 pm EST
Bruce, Ending a sentence with a preposition is something up with which grammarians will not put. However, ending one with a particle in a phrasal verb is perfectly acceptable, even for the most pedantic.
"He spread them a yard and a half. 'And every one that got away is this big.'"

--Fred Chappell
CaseyP
CaseyP's profile picture
Arlington, VA/ Mercersburg, PA

Posts: 653
CaseyP on Dec 27, 2013December 27th, 2013, 4:39 pm EST
Bruce, Ending a sentence with a preposition is something up with which grammarians will not put. However, ending one with a particle in a phrasal verb is perfectly acceptable, even for the most pedantic. (Martinlf)

ah, Louis, thank you for making my Master's worthwhile after all...i spent two long years trying to explain why your statement is true. in the end, the general conclusion was something like "...because people speak that way..." and "Not all ups, downs, ins, outs, and overs are prepositions."

trans: if it doesn't fit the rule, change its name and rewrite the rule.

roaches bring new friend.
we parse the many answers.
redefine! restate!

:-P
"You can observe a lot by watching." Yogi Berra

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