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Lateral view of a Female Hexagenia limbata (Ephemeridae) (Hex) Mayfly Dun from the Namekagon River in Wisconsin
Hex Mayflies
Hexagenia limbata

The famous nocturnal Hex hatch of the Midwest (and a few other lucky locations) stirs to the surface mythically large brown trout that only touch streamers for the rest of the year.

Dorsal view of a Zapada cinctipes (Nemouridae) (Tiny Winter Black) Stonefly Nymph from the Yakima River in Washington
Nymphs of this species were fairly common in late-winter kick net samples from the upper Yakima River. Although I could not find a key to species of Zapada nymphs, a revision of the Nemouridae family by Baumann (1975) includes the following helpful sentence: "2 cervical gills on each side of midline, 1 arising inside and 1 outside of lateral cervical sclerites, usually single and elongate, sometimes constricted but with 3 or 4 branches arising beyond gill base in Zapada cinctipes." This specimen clearly has the branches and is within the range of that species.
27" brown trout, my largest ever. It was the sub-dominant fish in its pool. After this, I hooked the bigger one, but I couldn't land it.
Troutnut is a project started in 2003 by salmonid ecologist Jason "Troutnut" Neuswanger to help anglers and fly tyers unabashedly embrace the entomological side of the sport. Learn more about Troutnut or support the project for an enhanced experience here.

Shawnny3
Moderator
Pleasant Gap, PA

Posts: 1197
Shawnny3 on Jun 24, 2013June 24th, 2013, 10:53 am EDT
My brother and I kept a few fish for dinner the other night and examined the stomach contents. There were a few insects and shrimp, but what I was most intrigued by was that about 95% of what was in their stomachs was seaweed. We were wondering if the fish consume this because they know it contains crustaceans and insects, or if the seaweed is consumed unintentionally as they consume bugs, or if they actually gain some nutrition from the seaweed. Thoughts?

-Shawn
Jewelry-Quality Artistic Salmon Flies, by Shawn Davis
www.davisflydesigns.com
Kschaefer3
Kschaefer3's profile picture
St. Paul, MN

Posts: 376
Kschaefer3 on Jun 24, 2013June 24th, 2013, 11:06 am EDT
I would be inclined to think they eat seaweed as a by product of eating insects and crustaceans, or because they know insects and crustaceans reside in them. This is a very interesting question though. Anyone have a good seaweed fly?
PaulRoberts
PaulRoberts's profile picture
Colorado

Posts: 1776
PaulRoberts on Jun 26, 2013June 26th, 2013, 4:03 pm EDT
Dunno. I've seen it too -filamentous algae I believe, but not to that degree. Any idea what the plants were?
Shawnny3
Moderator
Pleasant Gap, PA

Posts: 1197
Shawnny3 on Jun 26, 2013June 26th, 2013, 6:22 pm EDT
Not a clue. Probably the same stuff we kept picking off our flies. Maybe we should have left it on there. Then again, would that be considered bait fishing?

-Shawn
Jewelry-Quality Artistic Salmon Flies, by Shawn Davis
www.davisflydesigns.com
Gutcutter
Gutcutter's profile picture
Pennsylvania

Posts: 470
Gutcutter on Jun 27, 2013June 27th, 2013, 4:06 pm EDT
Maybe they're a vegan subspecies?
All men who fish may in turn be divided into two parts: those who fish for trout and those who don't. Trout fishermen are a race apart: they are a dedicated crew- indolent, improvident, and quietly mad.

-Robert Traver, Trout Madness
PaulRoberts
PaulRoberts's profile picture
Colorado

Posts: 1776
PaulRoberts on Jun 28, 2013June 28th, 2013, 1:52 pm EDT
Then again, would that be considered bait fishing?

-Shawn

I guess that would be considered vegan bait. AOK in some circles.

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