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Lateral view of a Female Hexagenia limbata (Ephemeridae) (Hex) Mayfly Dun from the Namekagon River in Wisconsin
Hex Mayflies
Hexagenia limbata

The famous nocturnal Hex hatch of the Midwest (and a few other lucky locations) stirs to the surface mythically large brown trout that only touch streamers for the rest of the year.

Dorsal view of a Holocentropus (Polycentropodidae) Caddisfly Larva from the Yakima River in Washington
This one seems to tentatively key to Holocentropus, although I can't make out the anal spines in Couplet 7 of the Key to Genera of Polycentropodidae Larvae nor the dark bands in Couplet 4 of the Key to Genera of Polycentropodidae Larvae, making me wonder if I went wrong somewhere in keying it out. I don't see where that could have happened, though. It might also be that it's a very immature larva and doesn't possess all the identifying characteristics in the key yet. If Holocentropus is correct, then Holocentropus flavus and Holocentropus interruptus are the two likely possibilities based on range, but I was not able to find a description of their larvae.
27" brown trout, my largest ever. It was the sub-dominant fish in its pool. After this, I hooked the bigger one, but I couldn't land it.
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This topic is about the Hellgrammite Genus Corydalus

The largest and most well-known hellgrammites belong to this genus, although in my collecting experiences the fishflies of Nigronia seem to be more common in trout streams.

Example specimen

Yemoss
Posts: 1
Yemoss on May 29, 2007May 29th, 2007, 6:02 pm EDT
Far from a fly-fisherman, I still wanted to identify a menacing- looking insect which invaded our late-night campfire council this past Memorial Day Weekend in Millford, PA on the Delaware River (cr 206 n). We stayed at Kittatiny Canoe Campgrounds, very commercial, but made the best of it. The amount of these bugs crawling around at night, lured by our glowing fire, was incredible. Today I identified them as Hellgramites, and also learned that they are prized by bass and trout. Didn't even think to bring a pole with the short weekend - we went rafting instead. Still wanted to inform fellow fisherman of the abundance and location of this critter. Important to note that our sites bordered the river - one website I read indicated that Hellgramites won't go more than 50 yards inland from their water source; I'm not sure if that's common to most aquatic species but I'd imagine so.
Wbranch
Wbranch's profile picture
York & Starlight PA

Posts: 2635
Wbranch on Jul 22, 2007July 22nd, 2007, 4:04 am EDT
I think the adult, winged insect, is called a Dobson Fly. They seem attracted to light and fly around in the night and can scare the heck out of you as they have big wings and pincers.
Catskill fly fisher for fifty-five years.
GONZO
Site Editor
"Bear Swamp," PA

Posts: 1681
GONZO on Jul 22, 2007July 22nd, 2007, 4:21 am EDT
...one website I read said that Hellgrammites won't go more than 50 yards inland from their water source....

Yemoss, that may have been referring to the travels of the Dobsonfly larvae (hellgrammites); they pupate terrestrially. Many adult aquatic insects are attracted to lights, often quite some distance from stream or lake.

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