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Lateral view of a Male Baetis (Baetidae) (Blue-Winged Olive) Mayfly Dun from Mystery Creek #43 in New York
Blue-winged Olives
Baetis

Tiny Baetis mayflies are perhaps the most commonly encountered and imitated by anglers on all American trout streams due to their great abundance, widespread distribution, and trout-friendly emergence habits.

Lateral view of a Onocosmoecus (Limnephilidae) (Great Late-Summer Sedge) Caddisfly Larva from the Yakima River in Washington
This specimen keys pretty easily to Onocosmoecus, and it closely resembles a specimen from Alaska which caddis expert Dave Ruiter recognized as this genus. As with that specimen, the only species in the genus documented in this area is Onocosmoecus unicolor, but Dave suggested for that specimen that there might be multiple not-yet-distinguished species under the unicolor umbrella and it would be best to stick with the genus-level ID. I'm doing the same for this one.
27" brown trout, my largest ever. It was the sub-dominant fish in its pool. After this, I hooked the bigger one, but I couldn't land it.
Troutnut is a project started in 2003 by salmonid ecologist Jason "Troutnut" Neuswanger to help anglers and fly tyers unabashedly embrace the entomological side of the sport. Learn more about Troutnut or support the project for an enhanced experience here.

By Troutnut on September 26th, 2012, 3:43 pm EDT
I had a terrific caribou hunt a few weeks ago, so I wrote about it (with many pictures) in the articles section.

Here's a sneak peek:













Check it out: Troutnut's 2012 Alaska Range Caribou Hunt.

Comments / replies

PaulRoberts
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Colorado

Posts: 1776
PaulRoberts on Sep 26, 2012September 26th, 2012, 4:53 pm EDT
GREAT story, stunning images, and excellent equipment (I have a Tikka too -sub MOA). Now that is living. Hunting stories like this are so full of vitality.

Love the very last section of the gear review:


Two human legs
Completely insufficient. The ideal mountain hunter is a centaur-like creature with a human torso atop a mountain goat's body. I could not live up to this, but a steady diet of electrolyte drink (vitalyte) and ibuprofin pushed me in the right direction just far enough to get the job done.

You definitely know you are alive at such times.

Thanks for sharing your hunt.
Feathers5
Posts: 287
Feathers5 on Sep 27, 2012September 27th, 2012, 5:46 am EDT
Fantastic images and story. You are a lucky man. Good for you.
Orn
.

Posts: 29
Orn on Sep 29, 2012September 29th, 2012, 1:03 pm EDT
Great story and a beautiful landscape!
.
Creno
Grants Pass, OR

Posts: 302
Creno on Sep 29, 2012September 29th, 2012, 4:19 pm EDT
Jason - From the pictures, to the shooting, to the carrying, to the walking, to the sleeping in bloody clothes in bear country. You are a better man than I...........
congratulations!
dave
Konchu
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Site Editor
Indiana

Posts: 498
Konchu on Sep 29, 2012September 29th, 2012, 4:46 pm EDT
Sounds like quite the adventure. Congrats, Jason.
Crepuscular
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Boiling Springs, PA

Posts: 920
Crepuscular on Oct 2, 2012October 2nd, 2012, 7:35 am EDT
Well done Jason, beautiful shots! Like Paul, I too love the last section of the gear review! As an obsessed Ruffed Grouse hunter, I can totally relate to that one! Thanks for posting!
PaulRoberts
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Colorado

Posts: 1776
PaulRoberts on Oct 2, 2012October 2nd, 2012, 11:41 am EDT
Hey Eric, I just walked in the door from chasing dusky's (former "blue" grouse) in some rugged canyons. I could sure use the four hooves of a centaur. And I missed twice -again! -which means 20 minutes of climbing to find each arrow. But I tend to get them all back, sometimes still intact.
Jmd123
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Oscoda, MI

Posts: 2474
Jmd123 on Oct 2, 2012October 2nd, 2012, 1:57 pm EDT
Jason, the photos are fabulous! What amazes me the most is the colors in them - so vibrant and beautiful. I suppose that's what you get up in AK for fall colors, instead of trees it's the tundra shrubs that all turn so brilliant. Also, congrats on a successful hunt! Thanks for sharing it all with us.

Jonathon
No matter how big the one you just caught is, there's always a bigger one out there somewhere...
Troutnut
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Bellevue, WA

Posts: 2758
Troutnut on Oct 2, 2012October 2nd, 2012, 9:14 pm EDT
I suppose that's what you get up in AK for fall colors, instead of trees it's the tundra shrubs that all turn so brilliant.


That's exactly right. The tundra in the fall is spectacular.

At lower elevation, it's all gold from the aspens and green from the spruce. There's very little red in the trees, but the gold can be really radiant.
Jason Neuswanger, Ph.D.
Troutnut and salmonid ecologist
Crepuscular
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Boiling Springs, PA

Posts: 920
Crepuscular on Oct 3, 2012October 3rd, 2012, 10:56 am EDT
20 minutes of climbing to find each arrow. But I tend to get them all back, sometimes still intact.

I can barely hit them with a shotgun, more power to ya hunting them with a bow. I'm sometimes amazed that my dogs actually remember what to do when I hit one. I'd like to get to Alaska one day and day chasing ptarmigan is definitely on my list of things to do there. I think I'd be pulled in a lot of different directions in that part of the world.
PaulRoberts
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Colorado

Posts: 1776
PaulRoberts on Oct 3, 2012October 3rd, 2012, 12:27 pm EDT
Well...I didn't say I hit that many of them. :) I get a few each season. And to be clear, I am not wing-shooting these grouse. I take them either on the ground, or when they tree with flu-flu fletching. This year a couple spots have more bids than usual, and I thought this would be the year I'd finally get a daily limit (3). But so far I'm 0/6 for the 3 days I've hunted. I'd been shooting well all summer, but switched to a different bow for small game hunting and it shoots a tad higher. I'm just grooved for that other bow and have had a heck of a time adjusting. I've shot JUST over every bird so far.
PaulRoberts
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Colorado

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PaulRoberts on Oct 3, 2012October 3rd, 2012, 12:31 pm EDT
Jason, what's the camera?
Troutnut
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Bellevue, WA

Posts: 2758
Troutnut on Oct 3, 2012October 3rd, 2012, 4:55 pm EDT
Paul, the pictures from the first day hunting are from a Panasonic Lumix DMC-LX3. It stopped working after that (I've beaten it up pretty badly) so I carried my Canon 20D DSLR around with my 70-200mm f/4L lens for all the packing.
Jason Neuswanger, Ph.D.
Troutnut and salmonid ecologist
Jmd123
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Oscoda, MI

Posts: 2474
Jmd123 on Oct 3, 2012October 3rd, 2012, 5:06 pm EDT
Now there's a man who's prepared - he brings a back-up camera! I will actually have a second camera soon, one that I had lost in the woods and then got back! The fellow who found it on the trails behind my house recognized my face from photos of me I had on there and was visiting a garage sale at one of my neighbor's houses...the LCD screen was broken, however, so it's been sent off for repair under warranty (it says "shockproof" right on the front of the camera...). So now I'll have a back-up too.

Jonathon
No matter how big the one you just caught is, there's always a bigger one out there somewhere...
PaulRoberts
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Colorado

Posts: 1776
PaulRoberts on Oct 3, 2012October 3rd, 2012, 6:16 pm EDT
The resolution looked mighty fine for a compact. I can see the mosquitoes around that caribou bull!
Troutnut
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Bellevue, WA

Posts: 2758
Troutnut on Oct 3, 2012October 3rd, 2012, 8:37 pm EDT
As I mentioned in the story, that first bull picture was actually taken a week before the trip -- it's one I could have shot if I'd brought my gun & tags. That one was taken with a rented Canon 7D, a better DSLR by far than my 20D. The other pictures on the first page of the story were taken with the 20D. Everything on the second page was taken with the compact. On the 3rd page, the top stuff is taken with the compact, and the 20D takes over on Sept 9th.

The Panasonic Lumix LX3 is a really nice compact camera, one of the earlier attempts to create a compact, carry-everywhere camera with a pro feature set and image quality. The current model in that line, the LX7, is even better. I do wish they both had a better optical zoom. Before I found out I could get a reasonable repair estimate for my LX3, I was looking into new cameras along those lines and these are the models I was considering. There are lots of nice cameras out there!
Jason Neuswanger, Ph.D.
Troutnut and salmonid ecologist
PaulRoberts
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Colorado

Posts: 1776
PaulRoberts on Oct 4, 2012October 4th, 2012, 7:13 am EDT
Thanks, Jason.

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