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Lateral view of a Female Hexagenia limbata (Ephemeridae) (Hex) Mayfly Dun from the Namekagon River in Wisconsin
Hex Mayflies
Hexagenia limbata

The famous nocturnal Hex hatch of the Midwest (and a few other lucky locations) stirs to the surface mythically large brown trout that only touch streamers for the rest of the year.

Lateral view of a Onocosmoecus (Limnephilidae) (Great Late-Summer Sedge) Caddisfly Larva from the Yakima River in Washington
This specimen keys pretty easily to Onocosmoecus, and it closely resembles a specimen from Alaska which caddis expert Dave Ruiter recognized as this genus. As with that specimen, the only species in the genus documented in this area is Onocosmoecus unicolor, but Dave suggested for that specimen that there might be multiple not-yet-distinguished species under the unicolor umbrella and it would be best to stick with the genus-level ID. I'm doing the same for this one.
27" brown trout, my largest ever. It was the sub-dominant fish in its pool. After this, I hooked the bigger one, but I couldn't land it.
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Crepuscular has attached these 4 pictures. The message is below.
Crepuscular
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Boiling Springs, PA

Posts: 920
Crepuscular on Jun 15, 2012June 15th, 2012, 5:43 am EDT
Pretty sure this is Anthopotamus verticis. I guess it could be myops. But it looks like there are some dark cross veins , so of course, I'll defer to the experts. It was on the door of my office this morning.
Entoman
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Northern CA & ID

Posts: 2604
Entoman on Jun 15, 2012June 15th, 2012, 9:45 am EDT
This Golden Drake female spinner is a good example of specimens that straddle the lines. Besides the cross veins, the eyes also look to rule out myops (too big). But it is fairly large and it almost has both the head stripe and large lateral spots on the abdomen that could put it at the edge of distinctus variability. However, I think you are correct in your assessment that this is verticus.

Notice the leg markings on this specimen vs. your specimen of the female distinctus and the male specimen of verticus on the other thread. I'm not aware of any description pointing out the significance of this but it's interesting.
"It's not that I find fishing so important, it's just that I find all other endeavors of Man equally unimportant... And not nearly as much fun!" Robert Traver, Anatomy of a Fisherman
GONZO
Site Editor
"Bear Swamp," PA

Posts: 1681
GONZO on Jun 15, 2012June 15th, 2012, 4:32 pm EDT
Notice the leg markings on this specimen vs. your specimen of the female distinctus and the male specimen of verticus on the other thread. I'm not aware of any description pointing out the significance of this but it's interesting.

The specific leg markings seen in Eric's (presumed) verticis specimens (the female here and the male in the related thread) are described by various authors--for example, in the descriptions of synonym diaphanus by Needham (1908) and Argo (1927) and the descriptions of synonym walkeri by Ide (1935). Perhaps the best and most detailed match for these markings is found in Ide's description of the male imago:

Foreleg pale with ferruginous tip to femur; joint between tibia and tarsus piceous or purplish and also the joints between tarsal segments.


Here's a curious side note: McCafferty and Meyer (2007) report finding specimens of this species (A. verticis) taken from the Upper Truckee River in California (from a CA collection borrowed from the Illinois Natural History Survey).
Entoman
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Northern CA & ID

Posts: 2604
Entoman on Jun 15, 2012June 15th, 2012, 7:17 pm EDT
Thanks for the detail! Yes, I remember seeing them in descriptions. By "significance" I meant for diagnostic purposes. Much like the head and pronotal stripe, they're mentioned (and they seem to be reasonably dependable), but not necessarily as diagnostic as the other characters we've been discussing? That's what I was musing about anyway...

Upper Truckee? Preposterously amazing! :) If it weren't for the quality of the source you quoted, I'd have trouble keeping my right eyebrow down. :) A lot of anglers think of the tumbling freestone water above town as the Upper Truckee, but I'm pretty sure the paper is referring to the actual U. Truckee (among other names), which is above the lake. It's pretty much off the angler radar system due to being entirely closed until the heat of Summer and even then, its access is severely restricted because of the golf course operation. It's small water and pretty cold, but there is a fair amount of sandy alluvial habitat just above where it enters the lake. You would think they'd prefer the bigger, warmer water on the Nevada reaches. Perhaps they are there as well. I believe there are other reports of this species in the West, though they don't come to mind right now. Montana maybe?
"It's not that I find fishing so important, it's just that I find all other endeavors of Man equally unimportant... And not nearly as much fun!" Robert Traver, Anatomy of a Fisherman
Entoman
Entoman's profile picture
Northern CA & ID

Posts: 2604
Entoman on Jun 16, 2012June 16th, 2012, 9:33 am EDT
BTW - the Upper Truckee should not be confused with the Little Truckee that meets the main stem at Boca. This is well downstream from town at the end of the special reg. section.
"It's not that I find fishing so important, it's just that I find all other endeavors of Man equally unimportant... And not nearly as much fun!" Robert Traver, Anatomy of a Fisherman

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