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Lateral view of a Male Baetis (Baetidae) (Blue-Winged Olive) Mayfly Dun from Mystery Creek #43 in New York
Blue-winged Olives
Baetis

Tiny Baetis mayflies are perhaps the most commonly encountered and imitated by anglers on all American trout streams due to their great abundance, widespread distribution, and trout-friendly emergence habits.

Case view of a Pycnopsyche guttifera (Limnephilidae) (Great Autumn Brown Sedge) Caddisfly Larva from the Yakima River in Washington
It's only barely visible in one of my pictures, but I confirmed under the microscope that this one has a prosternal horn and the antennae are mid-way between the eyes and front of the head capsule.

I'm calling this one Pycnopsyche, but it's a bit perplexing. It seems to key definitively to at least Couplet 8 of the Key to Genera of Limnephilidae Larvae. That narrows it down to three genera, and the case seems wrong for the other two. The case looks right for Pycnopsyche, and it fits one of the key characteristics: "Abdominal sternum II without chloride epithelium and abdominal segment IX with only single seta on each side of dorsal sclerite." However, the characteristic "metanotal sa1 sclerites not fused, although often contiguous" does not seem to fit well. Those sclerites sure look fused to me, although I can make out a thin groove in the touching halves in the anterior half under the microscope. Perhaps this is a regional variation.

The only species of Pycnopsyche documented in Washington state is Pycnopsyche guttifera, and the colors and markings around the head of this specimen seem to match very well a specimen of that species from Massachusetts on Bugguide. So I am placing it in that species for now.

Whatever species this is, I photographed another specimen of seemingly the same species from the same spot a couple months later.
27" brown trout, my largest ever. It was the sub-dominant fish in its pool. After this, I hooked the bigger one, but I couldn't land it.
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And has attached these 2 pictures to aid in identification. The message is below.
And
Europe

Posts: 14
And on Feb 22, 2007February 22nd, 2007, 5:43 am EST
Hello Jason, compliments for your web.
I found this one in alpine stream in Austria - Europe, I
guess it could be a tricoptera ? I discovered it under a peabble (2nd pic) and portayed it on white surface in the 1st pic, any suggestion ?
Thanks and Greetings

Andrea
GONZO
Site Editor
"Bear Swamp," PA

Posts: 1681
GONZO on Feb 22, 2007February 22nd, 2007, 5:57 am EST
And-

Not like any Trichoptera I've ever seen--perhaps a beetle larva?
And
Europe

Posts: 14
And on Feb 22, 2007February 22nd, 2007, 6:19 am EST
One more thing, it was around 1 cm long,

thanks

Andrea
Serotonin
Posts: 6
Serotonin on Feb 22, 2007February 22nd, 2007, 7:07 am EST
Hi guys.
This is my first post.

First, I'd like to say that I've really enjoyed this site since its inception, and I like it even more w/the new format. There is an incredible wealth of knowledge here.

I have encountered the bug pictured above, in a New York stream. I don't recall it's Latin name, but if memory serves, in Schwiebert's "Nymphs" he refers to it as a Snipe Fly Larva. I have also heard it called a Water Sprite.

I don't have the Nymphs book in front of me, but here's some photos I took a few winters ago. When disturbed, the things would thrash wildly until able to gain a foothold on something. I am considering making highly articulated larvae to mimic this behavior. Appx 1.5 cm.

Pictures Here
GONZO
Site Editor
"Bear Swamp," PA

Posts: 1681
GONZO on Feb 22, 2007February 22nd, 2007, 7:21 am EST
Good call, Serotonin. It does look like the Atherix larvae. Maybe David or Roger can nail this one down.
Serotonin
Posts: 6
Serotonin on Feb 22, 2007February 22nd, 2007, 7:26 am EST
Please excuse the following dumb question.
How do I post the images here...?
Taxon
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Plano, TX

Posts: 1311
Taxon on Feb 22, 2007February 22nd, 2007, 7:55 am EST
Serotonin-

EDIT:

The following link appears on the screen for creation of a new topic:

For help with formatting your text, see the forum code page.
Troutnut
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Administrator
Bellevue, WA

Posts: 2758
Troutnut on Feb 22, 2007February 22nd, 2007, 8:35 am EST
Yeah, I'm pretty sure this one is the genus Atherix in the family Athericidae. Serotonin's pics are Athericidae but probably not Atherix. They're all called "snipe flies" or "watersnipe flies" though.

I've got pictures of a couple specimens on this site.

Sorry about the tricky forum markup codes here. I cleaned up your posts a little bit to fit the syntax.
Jason Neuswanger, Ph.D.
Troutnut and salmonid ecologist
Taxon
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Plano, TX

Posts: 1311
Taxon on Feb 22, 2007February 22nd, 2007, 8:56 am EST
Andrea-

You have (3) species of Athericidae (Watersnipe Flies) in Austria, Atherix ibis, Atrichops crassipes, and Ibisia marginata. I believe yours to be Atherix ibis.
Best regards,
Roger Rohrbeck
www.FlyfishingEntomology.com
GONZO
Site Editor
"Bear Swamp," PA

Posts: 1681
GONZO on Feb 22, 2007February 22nd, 2007, 10:36 am EST
Hey Roger--where do you find your resources on European taxa? (I've looked on your site, but perhaps I'm missing something.) Not that I have any hope of ever fishing there, but at least it might keep me from using outdated nomenclature in the future.
Taxon
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Plano, TX

Posts: 1311
Taxon on Feb 22, 2007February 22nd, 2007, 10:46 am EST
Gonzo-

European Macro-Invertebrate Database is in the Taxonomy folder on my Recommended Websites page.
Best regards,
Roger Rohrbeck
www.FlyfishingEntomology.com
GONZO
Site Editor
"Bear Swamp," PA

Posts: 1681
GONZO on Feb 22, 2007February 22nd, 2007, 11:29 am EST
Thanks, Roger. I'd apologize for my lack of thoroughness and lame computer skills, but once one starts apologizing for one's shortcomings it's hard to know where to stop! :)
Taxon
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Plano, TX

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Taxon on Feb 22, 2007February 22nd, 2007, 12:00 pm EST
Gonzo-

You're welcome. On those rare occasions when I know something useful, I'm delighted to have the opportunity to share it.
Best regards,
Roger Rohrbeck
www.FlyfishingEntomology.com
And
Europe

Posts: 14
And on Feb 23, 2007February 23rd, 2007, 1:00 am EST
Hello folks, thanks a lot ! I would claim the case is solved
have a nice w/e

Andrea

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