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Lateral view of a Male Baetis (Baetidae) (Blue-Winged Olive) Mayfly Dun from Mystery Creek #43 in New York
Blue-winged Olives
Baetis

Tiny Baetis mayflies are perhaps the most commonly encountered and imitated by anglers on all American trout streams due to their great abundance, widespread distribution, and trout-friendly emergence habits.

Dorsal view of a Kogotus (Perlodidae) Stonefly Nymph from Mystery Creek #199 in Washington
This one pretty clearly keys to Kogotus, but it also looks fairly different from specimens I caught in the same creek about a month later in the year. With only one species of the genus known in Washington, I'm not sure about the answer to this ID.
27" brown trout, my largest ever. It was the sub-dominant fish in its pool. After this, I hooked the bigger one, but I couldn't land it.
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Alvin has attached this picture to aid in identification. The message is below.
Alvin
Posts: 1
Alvin on Apr 7, 2012April 7th, 2012, 9:56 am EDT
please tell me what is this
Entoman
Entoman's profile picture
Northern CA & ID

Posts: 2604
Entoman on Apr 7, 2012April 7th, 2012, 10:37 am EDT
Hi Alvin,

Welcome to the forum!

The top critter is a scud of some type.

The other one is a Chaoborus sp. larva of the family Chaoboridae. They are commonly called Glassworms in the larval stage and Phantom Midges as adults. These are aquatic critters of the Diptera order and great consumers of mosquito larvae. Did you find this in trout water?
"It's not that I find fishing so important, it's just that I find all other endeavors of Man equally unimportant... And not nearly as much fun!" Robert Traver, Anatomy of a Fisherman
Crepuscular
Crepuscular's profile picture
Boiling Springs, PA

Posts: 920
Crepuscular on Apr 7, 2012April 7th, 2012, 10:50 am EDT
I'd be really surprised if this came from moving water. I usually find them in lentic habitats.

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