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Artistic view of a Male Pteronarcys californica (Pteronarcyidae) (Giant Salmonfly) Stonefly Adult from the Gallatin River in Montana
Salmonflies
Pteronarcys californica

The giant Salmonflies of the Western mountains are legendary for their proclivity to elicit consistent dry-fly action and ferocious strikes.

Dorsal view of a Pycnopsyche guttifera (Limnephilidae) (Great Autumn Brown Sedge) Caddisfly Larva from the Yakima River in Washington
This specimen appears to be of the same species as this one collected in the same spot two months earlier. The identification of both is tentative. This one suffered some physical damage before being photographed, too, so the colors aren't totally natural. I was mostly photographing it to test out some new camera setting idea, which worked really well for a couple of closeups.
27" brown trout, my largest ever. It was the sub-dominant fish in its pool. After this, I hooked the bigger one, but I couldn't land it.
Troutnut is a project started in 2003 by salmonid ecologist Jason "Troutnut" Neuswanger to help anglers and fly tyers unabashedly embrace the entomological side of the sport. Learn more about Troutnut or support the project for an enhanced experience here.

Lateral view of a Female Amphinemura (Nemouridae) (Tiny Winter Black) Stonefly Adult from Mystery Creek #23 in New York
A few of these tiny stoneflies were among the only species of aquatic insect adults in the air on this particular afternoon, with most of the action coming from a species of Epeorus mayfly. I somehow forgot to photograph this one on the usual ruler, but I recall it was very, very small, with an abdomen no more than 1mm in girth and the body, not counting the wings, probably just 5-7mm long.
JaneBug
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JaneBug on Jan 25, 2007January 25th, 2007, 1:36 pm EST
The stonefly in this series of photos is not a Capniidae. It is a Nemouridae, a female Amphinemura. The yellow abdomen has eggs inside. Message from a stonefly researcher from Pennsylvania.
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Troutnut on Jan 25, 2007January 25th, 2007, 3:33 pm EST
Thanks! I've switched her over to that genus.
Jason Neuswanger, Ph.D.
Troutnut and salmonid ecologist
Taxon
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Taxon on Jan 26, 2007January 26th, 2007, 2:34 am EST
JaneBug-

Perhaps you could educate me a bit concerning female adult stonefly anatomy. What are those abdominal appendages (pointed to by red arrows) called in my blowup of Jason's ventral photo?



In case JaneBug is not still monitoring this thread, if anyone else knows the answer to my question, please enlighten me. Thanx.
Best regards,
Roger Rohrbeck
www.FlyfishingEntomology.com
Taxon
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Taxon on Jan 27, 2007January 27th, 2007, 5:21 pm EST
David-

Three tails? Seems like one too many.
Best regards,
Roger Rohrbeck
www.FlyfishingEntomology.com
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Troutnut on Jan 28, 2007January 28th, 2007, 4:12 am EST
I don't think he's suggesting three tails. The two lower arrows look like they're both pointing to the same bottom tail. What is that middle one supposed to be pointing at?
Jason Neuswanger, Ph.D.
Troutnut and salmonid ecologist
Taxon
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Taxon on Jan 28, 2007January 28th, 2007, 5:03 am EST
Jason-

Is the lower tail bent back on itself or something? If so, the middle arrow is pointing at the bent back section. Otherwise, there would appear to be a second appendage just above the lower tail, at which the middle arrow is pointing.
Best regards,
Roger Rohrbeck
www.FlyfishingEntomology.com
Troutnut
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Troutnut on Jan 28, 2007January 28th, 2007, 7:03 am EST
Hmm... if I look at it just right, the wing vein pattern in the background kinda forms a shape that could be mistaken for an abdominal appendage. Is that what you're looking at?

I'm really just seeing the two obvious symmetrical structures, top and bottom. It's very possible that you have a monitor that really brings out the contrast in that picture and makes something else look like part of the abdomen. (I can kind of see something if I tilt my laptop LCD just right, but I think it's nothing.)
Jason Neuswanger, Ph.D.
Troutnut and salmonid ecologist
Taxon
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Taxon on Jan 28, 2007January 28th, 2007, 9:54 am EST
Jason-



Hopefully, this will help. I've blown it up about 50%, turned up the contrast significantly, and labeled the arrows. I'm talking about the appendage, labeled b, which comes straight out of the abdomen, as compared to the appendage labeled c, which comes out at a slightly upward angle as compared to the (imaginary) horizon.

Can you see it better now?
Best regards,
Roger Rohrbeck
www.FlyfishingEntomology.com
Troutnut
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Troutnut on Jan 28, 2007January 28th, 2007, 11:49 am EST
I think what you've labeled appendage C is not an appendage, but a shadow or vein on the wings in the background. A and B are matching appendages on either side of the abdomen, and C is an illusion. I think.
Jason Neuswanger, Ph.D.
Troutnut and salmonid ecologist
CaseyP
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CaseyP on Jan 28, 2007January 28th, 2007, 1:15 pm EST
on my monitor, imagine a dumbbell on end. a shows the top bell and b and c show the bottom bell. what's hard to see is the bottom of the rounded shape of the top cerci.

i think...
"You can observe a lot by watching." Yogi Berra

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