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Lateral view of a Male Baetis (Baetidae) (Blue-Winged Olive) Mayfly Dun from Mystery Creek #43 in New York
Blue-winged Olives
Baetis

Tiny Baetis mayflies are perhaps the most commonly encountered and imitated by anglers on all American trout streams due to their great abundance, widespread distribution, and trout-friendly emergence habits.

Lateral view of a Female Sweltsa borealis (Chloroperlidae) (Boreal Sallfly) Stonefly Adult from Harris Creek in Washington
I was not fishing, but happened to be at an unrelated social event on a hill above this tiny creek (which I never even saw) when this stonefly flew by me. I assume it came from there. Some key characteristics are tricky to follow, but process of elimination ultimately led me to Sweltsa borealis. It is reassuringly similar to this specimen posted by Bob Newell years ago. It is also so strikingly similar to this nymph from the same river system that I'm comfortable identifying that nymph from this adult. I was especially pleased with the closeup photo of four mites parasitizing this one.
27" brown trout, my largest ever. It was the sub-dominant fish in its pool. After this, I hooked the bigger one, but I couldn't land it.
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This topic is about the Stonefly Family Nemouridae

Example specimens

Deligon
Posts: 3
Deligon on Jan 15, 2010January 15th, 2010, 2:21 pm EST
FISHED THE HIWASSEE RIVER IN TENN , TODAY JAN 15 2010 WEATHER HIGH 50,S
AFTER A COUPLE OF WEEKS OF TEMPS IN THE TEENS, EXPECTED MIDGE HATCH,
WE HAVE A SHAD KILL WHICH I WANTED TO FISH STREAMERS HOPING TO TAG A BIG BROWN. BUT THE WINTER STONEFLY HATCH TOOK THE SHOW. DRY FLY FISHING IN JAN. WHAT IS THE LIFE CYCLE OF THESE FLIES? CAN THEY TOLERATE THE COLD NIGHT TEMPS? DO THEY EAT AND DRINK? WHOW DO THEY MATE?
THE MORE I LEARN THE MORE I DISCOVER I DON'T KNOW

DELIGON
Taxon
Taxon's profile picture
Site Editor
Plano, TX

Posts: 1311
Taxon on Jan 15, 2010January 15th, 2010, 5:10 pm EST
Deligon-

I assume you are asking about Slender Winter Stoneflies (Capniids) as opposed to Midges.

Stoneflies have an incomplete life cycle, which means they have an egg stage, a nymphal stage (with multiple instars), and a winged adult life stage. Slender Winter Stoneflies are univoltine, which means the have a single generation per year. They spend the vast majority of their lives in the nymphal live stage. During their brief adult live stage, which would generally be measured in days rather than weeks, they are able to survive the harsh winter temperatures within a tiny "cavern" in the snow or ice, and rely on algae for food. Not sure what you mean by "WHOW DO THEY MATE?" but that may be for the best anyway, as I won't risk offending the sensibilities of my good friend, Louis.
Best regards,
Roger Rohrbeck
www.FlyfishingEntomology.com
Martinlf
Martinlf's profile picture
Moderator
Palmyra PA

Posts: 3047
Martinlf on Jan 22, 2010January 22nd, 2010, 10:10 am EST
Well, a first. Finally my objections to all the smutty talk about mating and private parts in some of the dreadful XXX rated threads have had an effect! Just don't look up any old threads on identifying caddis or the like, unless you want to be offended. There are explicit photos, some with red arrows pointing to . . . well, you don't want to know.
"He spread them a yard and a half. 'And every one that got away is this big.'"

--Fred Chappell

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