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Lateral view of a Male Baetis (Baetidae) (Blue-Winged Olive) Mayfly Dun from Mystery Creek #43 in New York
Blue-winged Olives
Baetis

Tiny Baetis mayflies are perhaps the most commonly encountered and imitated by anglers on all American trout streams due to their great abundance, widespread distribution, and trout-friendly emergence habits.

Lateral view of a Female Sweltsa borealis (Chloroperlidae) (Boreal Sallfly) Stonefly Adult from Harris Creek in Washington
I was not fishing, but happened to be at an unrelated social event on a hill above this tiny creek (which I never even saw) when this stonefly flew by me. I assume it came from there. Some key characteristics are tricky to follow, but process of elimination ultimately led me to Sweltsa borealis. It is reassuringly similar to this specimen posted by Bob Newell years ago. It is also so strikingly similar to this nymph from the same river system that I'm comfortable identifying that nymph from this adult. I was especially pleased with the closeup photo of four mites parasitizing this one.
27" brown trout, my largest ever. It was the sub-dominant fish in its pool. After this, I hooked the bigger one, but I couldn't land it.
Troutnut is a project started in 2003 by salmonid ecologist Jason "Troutnut" Neuswanger to help anglers and fly tyers unabashedly embrace the entomological side of the sport. Learn more about Troutnut or support the project for an enhanced experience here.

Troutnut
Troutnut's profile picture
Administrator
Bellevue, WA

Posts: 2758
Troutnut on Oct 22, 2006October 22nd, 2006, 8:34 am EDT
Here's an amusing story on ABC News.

Bluegills are sensitive? Really? Somebody should tell the DoD about brook trout.

The article includes a pretty amusing quote from an army biologist:

"Our command structure views it as a deterrent, you let them [the terrorists] know that you have this," he said.


"Step back, Osama! We have bluegills and we're not afraid to use them!"

Because fish are inherently complex beings, the IABS uses eight bluegills to ensure accuracy.


So, to count up the US armament...

Nuclear warheads: 24,854
Bluegills: 8

Nobody will mess with us now!
Jason Neuswanger, Ph.D.
Troutnut and salmonid ecologist
GONZO
Site Editor
"Bear Swamp," PA

Posts: 1681
GONZO on Oct 22, 2006October 22nd, 2006, 9:16 am EDT
I feel so much safer knowing that coughing bluegills are standing guard over our water supply. Perhaps there's a species that could assist in the search for WMDs. The walking catfish comes to mind. And should we need assault troops, there's always the SNL land shark.

On second thought, I'm sure that PETA would find some reason to object to all of this....Never mind.
Troutnut
Troutnut's profile picture
Administrator
Bellevue, WA

Posts: 2758
Troutnut on Oct 23, 2006October 23rd, 2006, 6:30 am EDT
On second thought, I'm sure that PETA would find some reason to object to all of this....Never mind.


Maybe, but bluegills have been getting a free ride for far too long. It's about time some of them served their country, instead of getting served to their country...
Jason Neuswanger, Ph.D.
Troutnut and salmonid ecologist
Taxon
Taxon's profile picture
Site Editor
Plano, TX

Posts: 1311
Taxon on Oct 23, 2006October 23rd, 2006, 7:05 am EDT
I hesitate to interrupt the humorous banter, but you guys are just too funny. It's actually bringing tears to my eyes.
Best regards,
Roger Rohrbeck
www.FlyfishingEntomology.com
GONZO
Site Editor
"Bear Swamp," PA

Posts: 1681
GONZO on Oct 23, 2006October 23rd, 2006, 10:40 am EDT
Jason-

Your play on words reminded me of an old television program. I can't remember if it was a Twilight Zone or an Outer Limits episode, but it was about aliens visiting the earth. As I recall, the title of the episode was "To Serve Man." I don't know if you've ever seen it, but I'm sure you can imagine the double-entendre, Soylent Green type of twist the plot took.
Fly_Tyier
Iowa

Posts: 5
Fly_Tyier on Jan 7, 2007January 7th, 2007, 2:14 pm EST
I feel extreamly safe now that they have a bluegill army up and running, or hopping? would bluegills run or hop? thats going to puzzle me for awhile. lol.
Brett
Martinsburg, WV

Posts: 15
Brett on Jan 8, 2007January 8th, 2007, 4:46 am EST
Dear Sirs:

I humbly request a small contingent of your best-armed (best-eared?) bluegill be sent to the lower Potomac watershed. Just as the Brits in 1812 infiltrated our country through the Chesapeake Bay, so too are the exotic Asian snakeheads. Maryland and Virginia DNR have found many waiting in ambush in the aquatic vegetation near Gen. Washington's Mt. Vernon. Current snakehead numbers are unknown but armaments consist of dozens of sharp teeth, highly armoured exteriors, and primitve lungs making amphibious landings possible. I'll await your schools of reinforcements.

Your humble servant,
Specialist Brett Billings
(US Army, honorably discharged)
Brett
Novice entomologist, fly-tyer and photographer
CaseyP
CaseyP's profile picture
Arlington, VA/ Mercersburg, PA

Posts: 653
CaseyP on Jan 8, 2007January 8th, 2007, 4:58 am EST



is it okay to keep the next bluegill i catch just to test my kitchen faucet water? here in Arlington, just outside Washington, the tap water kills aquarium fish.
"You can observe a lot by watching." Yogi Berra

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