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Lateral view of a Female Hexagenia limbata (Ephemeridae) (Hex) Mayfly Dun from the Namekagon River in Wisconsin
Hex Mayflies
Hexagenia limbata

The famous nocturnal Hex hatch of the Midwest (and a few other lucky locations) stirs to the surface mythically large brown trout that only touch streamers for the rest of the year.

Dorsal view of a Ephemerella mucronata (Ephemerellidae) Mayfly Nymph from the Yakima River in Washington
This is an interesting one. Following the keys in Merritt R.W., Cummins, K.W., and Berg, M.B. (2019) and Jacobus et al. (2014), it keys clearly to Ephemerella. Jacobus et al provide a key to species, but some of the characteristics are tricky to interpret without illustrations. If I didn't make any mistakes, this one keys to Ephemerella mucronata, which has not previously been reported any closer to here than Montana and Alberta. The main character seems to fit well: "Abdominal terga with prominent, paired, subparallel, spiculate ridges." Several illustrations or descriptions of this holarctic species from the US and Europe seem to match, including the body length, tarsal claws and denticles, labial palp, and gill shapes. These sources include including Richard Allen's original description of this species in North America under the now-defunct name E. moffatae in Allen RK (1977) and the figures in this description of the species in Italy.
27" brown trout, my largest ever. It was the sub-dominant fish in its pool. After this, I hooked the bigger one, but I couldn't land it.
Troutnut is a project started in 2003 by salmonid ecologist Jason "Troutnut" Neuswanger to help anglers and fly tyers unabashedly embrace the entomological side of the sport. Learn more about Troutnut or support the project for an enhanced experience here.

Female Brachycentrus americanus (Brachycentridae) (American Grannom) Caddisfly Adult from the Fall River in California
Size 11 mm. Prior to this photo the specimen dropped its large egg mass that was a very dark (almost black) olive sphere almost twice the diameter of the abdomen. Notice the abdomen visible through the wings is both thickened and shortened post egg drop.
Creno
Grants Pass, OR

Posts: 302
Creno on Oct 21, 2011October 21st, 2011, 10:26 am EDT
there is a link for the locality however the link does not work. Is it possible to include locality information with the image itself? That way when a link is broke in the future it is still possible to associate the specimen with the location, date, collector, etc.
Entoman
Entoman's profile picture
Northern CA & ID

Posts: 2604
Entoman on Oct 21, 2011October 21st, 2011, 11:19 am EDT
Hi Dave,

It is supposed to. Already sent a PM to Jason to help me sort out what I'm doing wrong.

Regards,

Kurt

"It's not that I find fishing so important, it's just that I find all other endeavors of Man equally unimportant... And not nearly as much fun!" Robert Traver, Anatomy of a Fisherman
Troutnut
Troutnut's profile picture
Administrator
Bellevue, WA

Posts: 2758
Troutnut on Oct 21, 2011October 21st, 2011, 11:43 am EDT
Dave, I'm helping get Kurt up to speed on making locations work right. These are his first additions to the site, and the system I've designed for keeping track of locations is a little bit confusing at first. Soon it'll all be fixed.
Jason Neuswanger, Ph.D.
Troutnut and salmonid ecologist

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