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Lateral view of a Male Baetis (Baetidae) (Blue-Winged Olive) Mayfly Dun from Mystery Creek #43 in New York
Blue-winged Olives
Baetis

Tiny Baetis mayflies are perhaps the most commonly encountered and imitated by anglers on all American trout streams due to their great abundance, widespread distribution, and trout-friendly emergence habits.

Dorsal view of a Skwala (Perlodidae) (Large Springfly) Stonefly Nymph from the Yakima River in Washington
This Skwala nymph still has a couple months left to go before hatching, but it's still a good representative of its species, which was extremely abundant in my sample for a stonefly of this size. It's obvious why the Yakima is known for its Skwala hatch.
27" brown trout, my largest ever. It was the sub-dominant fish in its pool. After this, I hooked the bigger one, but I couldn't land it.
Troutnut is a project started in 2003 by salmonid ecologist Jason "Troutnut" Neuswanger to help anglers and fly tyers unabashedly embrace the entomological side of the sport. Learn more about Troutnut or support the project for an enhanced experience here.

JAD
JAD's profile picture
Alexandria Pa

Posts: 362
JAD on Dec 5, 2010December 5th, 2010, 1:53 pm EST
I thought some of the forum people would like this idea.

JaD

They fasten red (crimson red) wool around a hook, and fix onto the wool two feathers which grow under a cock’s wattles, and which in colour are like wax.
Radcliffe's Fishing from the Earliest Times,
Taxon
Taxon's profile picture
Site Editor
Plano, TX

Posts: 1311
Taxon on Dec 5, 2010December 5th, 2010, 3:29 pm EST
Hi John-

Yes, it's a good idea to remind people that storm drains empty into waterways containing fish. In WA where I live, we've had similar signage for perhaps 15 years.
Best regards,
Roger Rohrbeck
www.FlyfishingEntomology.com
PaulRoberts
PaulRoberts's profile picture
Colorado

Posts: 1776
PaulRoberts on Dec 6, 2010December 6th, 2010, 3:50 am EST
Communities I've lived in have these signs too. I wonder how effective they are? Although the dumping of toxic materials is a potential issue, it's much less than it was 30 years ago when people were much more clueless about pollution.

Problem is, storms drains themselves are an indication of poor-in-practice water cycle management -"suburban headwater streams" I call them. If you pave a landscape, or add rooftops, you've destroyed water retention and have to start ditching. Necessary evil. If you have a trout stream you love, watch development plans in that watershed and push for intelligent water management.
RleeP
NW PA - Pennsylvania's Glacial Pothole Wonderland

Posts: 398
RleeP on Dec 6, 2010December 6th, 2010, 6:13 am EST
The signs never hurt, regardless of the technical efficacy of wastewater treatment wherever we are. Actually, based on what I've been reading/seeing lately, a good place to maybe add the signs would be on the tank of everybody's toilet...

There's a lot of spooky speculation (and becoming less "speculative" and more confirmed by the day) regarding the impact of trace amounts of disposed pharmaceuticals either simply flushed or in some cases, or already metabolized in others, on fish populations. They're finding nanogram-level concentrations of everything from ibuprofen to estrogen to Mirtazapine to Prozac to the statin drugs at measurable levels in our waterways and there is a growing body of evidence that these traces may be causing changes in the reproductive capacity of various fish populations.

Virtually none of the modern water treatment systems are capable of filtering this stuff out and the drug chains around here are all offering free disposal services for unused or expired prescriptions.

When it comes to fish (and the natural world around us), it never ends. Our mere presence is always trying to eradicate all other life in one way or another. It's always something...
PaulRoberts
PaulRoberts's profile picture
Colorado

Posts: 1776
PaulRoberts on Dec 6, 2010December 6th, 2010, 7:09 am EST
Our mere presence is always trying to eradicate all other life in one way or another. It's always something...

So true. There are just SO many of us now.
JAD
JAD's profile picture
Alexandria Pa

Posts: 362
JAD on Dec 6, 2010December 6th, 2010, 9:23 am EST
I live in Western Pa, we must be behind the times.A first for sure in this area ,I think I will bring this up to city council meeting.

Best
John

They fasten red (crimson red) wool around a hook, and fix onto the wool two feathers which grow under a cock’s wattles, and which in colour are like wax.
Radcliffe's Fishing from the Earliest Times,
Jmd123
Jmd123's profile picture
Oscoda, MI

Posts: 2474
Jmd123 on Dec 6, 2010December 6th, 2010, 9:29 am EST
I started seeing these types of signs in Oregon back in '93. Their salmonids needed all the help they could get! Probably still do, from what I've heard...

Don't know exactly where it started but I've seen them here in Michigan quite a bit lately, also signage over culverts & bridge crossings spelling out just what river each little tributary drains to. I think it's a great idea because most people have no clue that their local "drainage ditch" or street drain actually goes to a river or lake instead of down the toilet to the wastewater treatment plant!

Jonathon
No matter how big the one you just caught is, there's always a bigger one out there somewhere...
Oldredbarn
Oldredbarn's profile picture
Novi, MI

Posts: 2600
Oldredbarn on Dec 7, 2010December 7th, 2010, 6:41 am EST
a good place to maybe add the signs would be on the tank of everybody's toilet...


Lee,

In the early 70's when I first started college I had a poli-sci professor who used the American toilet as a metaphor for the way we deal with a lot of things...He use to say that we flushed it down the toilet and forgot about it, it's now downstream, and someone else's problem...Then go on with the rest of our day.

It's not just from folks throwing out their meds...It's the excess our bodies can't metabolize and we piss away...I can think of a million ways to go with this for a joke, but it taint' funny.

Spence
"Even when my best efforts fail it's a satisfying challenge, and that, after all, is the essence of fly fishing." -Chauncy Lively

"Envy not the man who lives beside the river, but the man the river flows through." Joseph T Heywood
Softhackle
Softhackle's profile picture
Wellsville, NY

Posts: 540
Softhackle on Dec 8, 2010December 8th, 2010, 7:11 am EST
Hi all,
I think it is a great idea. We need more reminders like that.

Spence,
In the early 70s I worked in the City of Syracuse Sewage Treatment Facility. You would not believe the things people flushed down the toilet!

Mark
"I have the highest respect for the skilled wet-fly fisherman, as he has mastered an art of very great difficulty." Edward R. Hewitt

Flymphs, Soft-hackles and Spiders: http://www.troutnut.com/libstudio/FS&S/index.html
Konchu
Konchu's profile picture
Site Editor
Indiana

Posts: 498
Konchu on Dec 8, 2010December 8th, 2010, 12:32 pm EST
In the past, I've asked classes if their faucet is connected to someone else's drain. For most of us, the answer is yes.

On another note the Muffin Monster is an eye opener. I hope the link is listed

www.jwce.com/category/muffin-monster-grinders

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