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Lateral view of a Female Hexagenia limbata (Ephemeridae) (Hex) Mayfly Dun from the Namekagon River in Wisconsin
Hex Mayflies
Hexagenia limbata

The famous nocturnal Hex hatch of the Midwest (and a few other lucky locations) stirs to the surface mythically large brown trout that only touch streamers for the rest of the year.

Dorsal view of a Zapada cinctipes (Nemouridae) (Tiny Winter Black) Stonefly Nymph from the Yakima River in Washington
Nymphs of this species were fairly common in late-winter kick net samples from the upper Yakima River. Although I could not find a key to species of Zapada nymphs, a revision of the Nemouridae family by Baumann (1975) includes the following helpful sentence: "2 cervical gills on each side of midline, 1 arising inside and 1 outside of lateral cervical sclerites, usually single and elongate, sometimes constricted but with 3 or 4 branches arising beyond gill base in Zapada cinctipes." This specimen clearly has the branches and is within the range of that species.
27" brown trout, my largest ever. It was the sub-dominant fish in its pool. After this, I hooked the bigger one, but I couldn't land it.
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This topic is about the Insect Order Trichoptera

Some say caddisflies are even more important than mayflies, and they are probably right. The angling world has taken a while to come to terms with this blasphemy. Caddis imitations are close to receiving their fare share of time on the end of the tippet, but too many anglers still assume all caddisflies are pretty much the same.

Caddis species actually provide as much incentive to learn their specifics as the mayflies do. There is just as much variety in their emergence and egg-laying behaviors, and as many patterns and techniques are needed to match them. Anglers are hampered only by the relative lack of information about caddisfly behavior and identification.

Example specimens

Deke
Posts: 4
Deke on Aug 20, 2009August 20th, 2009, 1:25 pm EDT
i was fossil hunting and came across these i live in west tn,i tohught it was a fossil at first then relized its really small pebbles and relized it was some sort of a cacoon ,wondering what can build this i put them in my aquarium for the night as they are crawling ill put them back tommorow.very interesting creatures i have never seen anyhting like this in my creek all my life thought i was on a endagered species hehe.and im pretty sure this is what they are now that i found your site but what is odd is there is no trout in my creek its on the small size and they was only 3 under this rock each about a inch long. they are not to my knowledge at all in the main creek with crawfish's and minnow's i dont have no plankton for them to eat i threw grass in there and spring water it probably has some and a piece of a sardine know that i know they can fly i do not wish to keep them also hehe but they are cute"in a manly way"

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