Header image
Enter a name
Lateral view of a Male Baetis (Baetidae) (Blue-Winged Olive) Mayfly Dun from Mystery Creek #43 in New York
Blue-winged Olives
Baetis

Tiny Baetis mayflies are perhaps the most commonly encountered and imitated by anglers on all American trout streams due to their great abundance, widespread distribution, and trout-friendly emergence habits.

Dorsal view of a Holocentropus (Polycentropodidae) Caddisfly Larva from the Yakima River in Washington
This one seems to tentatively key to Holocentropus, although I can't make out the anal spines in Couplet 7 of the Key to Genera of Polycentropodidae Larvae nor the dark bands in Couplet 4 of the Key to Genera of Polycentropodidae Larvae, making me wonder if I went wrong somewhere in keying it out. I don't see where that could have happened, though. It might also be that it's a very immature larva and doesn't possess all the identifying characteristics in the key yet. If Holocentropus is correct, then Holocentropus flavus and Holocentropus interruptus are the two likely possibilities based on range, but I was not able to find a description of their larvae.
27" brown trout, my largest ever. It was the sub-dominant fish in its pool. After this, I hooked the bigger one, but I couldn't land it.
Troutnut is a project started in 2003 by salmonid ecologist Jason "Troutnut" Neuswanger to help anglers and fly tyers unabashedly embrace the entomological side of the sport. Learn more about Troutnut or support the project for an enhanced experience here.

Canerodder has attached this picture to aid in identification. The message is below.
Canerodder
Posts: 1
Canerodder on May 26, 2009May 26th, 2009, 3:52 pm EDT
Found this guy on a small creek in west Michigan yesterday around 1:30pm....a few ive talked with thought March Brown...but it was very cream colored?

GONZO
Site Editor
"Bear Swamp," PA

Posts: 1681
GONZO on May 26, 2009May 26th, 2009, 5:43 pm EDT
Looks like a female M. vicarium dun (March Brown/Gray Fox) to me.
Konchu
Konchu's profile picture
Site Editor
Indiana

Posts: 498
Konchu on May 27, 2009May 27th, 2009, 1:30 am EDT
We've had a lot of March Browns out this spring in Indiana. The light color could be because this one just emerged from the nymph stage. It takes them a bit to darken up.
Wiflyfisher
Wiflyfisher's profile picture
Wisconsin

Posts: 622
Wiflyfisher on May 27, 2009May 27th, 2009, 5:02 am EDT
We've had a lot of March Browns out this spring in Indiana. The light color could be because this one just emerged from the nymph stage. It takes them a bit to darken up.


Just adding to what Konchu is saying... If you ever put your rod down and pick up a seine and capture some duns as they are emerging from their nymphal case you will probably be "dun shrucked" how much lighter they can be at this time.

I have observed that some duns spend too much time sunning themselves and get sun burned easily, which accounts for the color variations.
Martinlf
Martinlf's profile picture
Moderator
Palmyra PA

Posts: 3047
Martinlf on May 27, 2009May 27th, 2009, 8:56 am EDT
Also check the dorsal and ventral sides for the difference in color to consider what the fish sees.
"He spread them a yard and a half. 'And every one that got away is this big.'"

--Fred Chappell

Quick Reply

Related Discussions

Topic
Replies
Last Reply
2
May 13, 2012
by Konchu
Troutnut.com is copyright © 2004-2024 (email Jason). privacy policy