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Lateral view of a Male Baetis (Baetidae) (Blue-Winged Olive) Mayfly Dun from Mystery Creek #43 in New York
Blue-winged Olives
Baetis

Tiny Baetis mayflies are perhaps the most commonly encountered and imitated by anglers on all American trout streams due to their great abundance, widespread distribution, and trout-friendly emergence habits.

Dorsal view of a Zapada cinctipes (Nemouridae) (Tiny Winter Black) Stonefly Nymph from the Yakima River in Washington
Nymphs of this species were fairly common in late-winter kick net samples from the upper Yakima River. Although I could not find a key to species of Zapada nymphs, a revision of the Nemouridae family by Baumann (1975) includes the following helpful sentence: "2 cervical gills on each side of midline, 1 arising inside and 1 outside of lateral cervical sclerites, usually single and elongate, sometimes constricted but with 3 or 4 branches arising beyond gill base in Zapada cinctipes." This specimen clearly has the branches and is within the range of that species.
27" brown trout, my largest ever. It was the sub-dominant fish in its pool. After this, I hooked the bigger one, but I couldn't land it.
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Lastchance
Portage, PA

Posts: 437
Lastchance on Jul 4, 2009July 4th, 2009, 2:08 pm EDT
What is the FLAV mayfly that I'll be fishing out West in August? I'm not sure what to tie, what colors they are or what size. Anyone have a parachute or sparkle dun pattern?
Thanks,
Bruce
GONZO
Site Editor
"Bear Swamp," PA

Posts: 1681
GONZO on Jul 4, 2009July 4th, 2009, 3:35 pm EDT
Bruce,

Drunella flavilinea (Ephemerella flavilinea in older texts) is a medium-size Western ephemerellid species, aka Small Western Green Drake or Slate-Winged Olive. You can find photos, info, and (if you'll click on the pattern names at the bottom of the page) some patterns to try here:
http://www.westfly.com/entomology/mayfly/flav.shtml
(Please note that you'll have to adjust the colors of the patterns--which are really tying style suggestions--to the colors indicated for the flavs. Emergers or freshly emerged duns will have lighter body colors.)
Taxon
Taxon's profile picture
Site Editor
Plano, TX

Posts: 1311
Taxon on Jul 4, 2009July 4th, 2009, 3:38 pm EDT
Bruce-

The mayflies are Drunella flavilinea and D. coloradensis, which are said to be so similar that even entomologists have trouble telling them apart. Commonly referred to as either Flavs or Lesser Green Drakes, there is a sufficient amount to say about them, that Western Mayfly Hatches by Hafele and Hughes devotes a separate chapter (15 pages) to them. My recommendation would be to simply order the book, as in my opinion, it is (by far) the best book available for western mayflies.
Best regards,
Roger Rohrbeck
www.FlyfishingEntomology.com
GONZO
Site Editor
"Bear Swamp," PA

Posts: 1681
GONZO on Jul 4, 2009July 4th, 2009, 3:54 pm EDT
Ha! Happy 4th, Roger...and the same to all my fellow Troutnuts! :)
Taxon
Taxon's profile picture
Site Editor
Plano, TX

Posts: 1311
Taxon on Jul 4, 2009July 4th, 2009, 4:00 pm EDT
Ah, now I get it, looks like we were keying at the same time. A happy 4th to you too, Lloyd.
Best regards,
Roger Rohrbeck
www.FlyfishingEntomology.com
Lastchance
Portage, PA

Posts: 437
Lastchance on Jul 6, 2009July 6th, 2009, 3:22 pm EDT
Thanks: I guess I should have known. I never heard of them until this trip out West became a reality. I looked on the site but I couldn't locate them, but I'm sure I must have looked in the wrong place.
Bruce
Doublespey
Posts: 61
Doublespey on Jan 17, 2012January 17th, 2012, 9:38 am EST

I've fished them on the Henry's Fork below Ashton, They generally come off in the lower light, late afternoon, BUT, some mid-afernoon rain clouds can bring on a great hatch. A #14 Parachute olive body works well along with the same body comparadun. I did well one day with no flavs with me, and a sudden rainfall, and flavs and fish were everywhere. I did well on a Parachute Adams size #14. Sizes are #14-16 and a brown shuck and olive bodied Comparadun is a great pattern. Hot, warm day in July and it will be 8 PM, or later before they come off. Fish luv'um, and generally aren't that picky when flavs come off.

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