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Lateral view of a Male Baetis (Baetidae) (Blue-Winged Olive) Mayfly Dun from Mystery Creek #43 in New York
Blue-winged Olives
Baetis

Tiny Baetis mayflies are perhaps the most commonly encountered and imitated by anglers on all American trout streams due to their great abundance, widespread distribution, and trout-friendly emergence habits.

Dorsal view of a Holocentropus (Polycentropodidae) Caddisfly Larva from the Yakima River in Washington
This one seems to tentatively key to Holocentropus, although I can't make out the anal spines in Couplet 7 of the Key to Genera of Polycentropodidae Larvae nor the dark bands in Couplet 4 of the Key to Genera of Polycentropodidae Larvae, making me wonder if I went wrong somewhere in keying it out. I don't see where that could have happened, though. It might also be that it's a very immature larva and doesn't possess all the identifying characteristics in the key yet. If Holocentropus is correct, then Holocentropus flavus and Holocentropus interruptus are the two likely possibilities based on range, but I was not able to find a description of their larvae.
27" brown trout, my largest ever. It was the sub-dominant fish in its pool. After this, I hooked the bigger one, but I couldn't land it.
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Sandfly has attached this picture to aid in identification. The message is below.
Sandfly
tioga co. pa.

Posts: 33
Sandfly on Jan 7, 2009January 7th, 2009, 12:35 pm EST
not sure if this is a stone or not. Any help..
sandfly
shop owner
N.J.B.B.A. #2215
Tiadaughton T.U. 688
I didn't Escape------They gave me a day pass !
Taxon
Taxon's profile picture
Site Editor
Plano, TX

Posts: 1311
Taxon on Jan 8, 2009January 8th, 2009, 2:13 am EST
Bob-

That is a strange one. Wish your photo had better definition. Doesn't look like a stonefly nymph to me. With the truncate (or perhaps vertical) head, and quite widely separated thoracic segment plates, it really doesn't look exactly like any aquatic insect immature I recall seeing. How long was it? Was it clinging to the underside of a submerged rock?
Best regards,
Roger Rohrbeck
www.FlyfishingEntomology.com
Sandfly
tioga co. pa.

Posts: 33
Sandfly on Jan 8, 2009January 8th, 2009, 8:09 am EST
yes under a rock with a few other stone flys. hopin to find more this year.sorry only pic i had with a 4meg camera have a 7 meg this year.
sandfly
shop owner
N.J.B.B.A. #2215
Tiadaughton T.U. 688
I didn't Escape------They gave me a day pass !

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