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Lateral view of a Female Hexagenia limbata (Ephemeridae) (Hex) Mayfly Dun from the Namekagon River in Wisconsin
Hex Mayflies
Hexagenia limbata

The famous nocturnal Hex hatch of the Midwest (and a few other lucky locations) stirs to the surface mythically large brown trout that only touch streamers for the rest of the year.

Dorsal view of a Zapada cinctipes (Nemouridae) (Tiny Winter Black) Stonefly Nymph from the Yakima River in Washington
Nymphs of this species were fairly common in late-winter kick net samples from the upper Yakima River. Although I could not find a key to species of Zapada nymphs, a revision of the Nemouridae family by Baumann (1975) includes the following helpful sentence: "2 cervical gills on each side of midline, 1 arising inside and 1 outside of lateral cervical sclerites, usually single and elongate, sometimes constricted but with 3 or 4 branches arising beyond gill base in Zapada cinctipes." This specimen clearly has the branches and is within the range of that species.
27" brown trout, my largest ever. It was the sub-dominant fish in its pool. After this, I hooked the bigger one, but I couldn't land it.
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Tsali has attached these 3 pictures to aid in identification. The message is below.
Tsali
Posts: 4
Tsali on Jun 14, 2015June 14th, 2015, 7:59 pm EDT
Good evening,

I’m working on an identification for a Perlid and something that has me perplexed is the cross vein in the right forewing anal region but doesn’t exist in the left forewing? I’m sure it’s something I’m overlooking. Thanks in advance.

Taxon
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Site Editor
Plano, TX

Posts: 1311
Taxon on Jun 15, 2015June 15th, 2015, 12:21 am EDT
Gary-

Cross veins are much less consistently located than longitudinal veins. As I recall, Dr. McCafferty shared that information with me well over a decade ago, and in response to a question very similar to yours. :-)
Best regards,
Roger Rohrbeck
www.FlyfishingEntomology.com
Tsali
Posts: 4
Tsali on Jun 15, 2015June 15th, 2015, 4:11 am EDT
Thanks for the quick reply. If following Merritt and Cummins would you consider the forewings to have no crossveins then? If with one or more crossveins the couplet takes you to Hansonoperla or Perlinella but the diagnostics for these don't seem to fit.

Thanks.
Feathers5
Posts: 287
Feathers5 on Jun 15, 2015June 15th, 2015, 5:26 am EDT
That looks like a sulfur to me.
Taxon
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Site Editor
Plano, TX

Posts: 1311
Taxon on Jun 15, 2015June 15th, 2015, 7:25 am EDT
Gary-

I would need some context in order to offer any help regarding genus level identification. In which state or province was this specimen collected, and on what date?
Best regards,
Roger Rohrbeck
www.FlyfishingEntomology.com
Tsali
Posts: 4
Tsali on Jun 15, 2015June 15th, 2015, 4:28 pm EDT
Ignoring the cross vein I keyed this out as Acroneuria but I'm questioning this one for some reason. Body length is 25mm and wing length is 28mm. Specimen was collected in East Tennessee in the Hiwassee River in June. I've attached a couple of dorsal and ventral images to the original post.

Thanks.
Millcreek
Healdsburg, CA

Posts: 344
Millcreek on Jun 15, 2015June 15th, 2015, 5:53 pm EDT
Gary-

Looks like Acroneuria to me. Here are a couple of sites that show pictures.

http://bugguide.net/node/view/896136/bgimage

http://bugguide.net/node/view/60917/bgimage
"If we knew what it was we were doing, it would not be called research, would it?"
-Albert Einstein
Tsali
Posts: 4
Tsali on Jun 17, 2015June 17th, 2015, 4:44 am EDT
Mark - Thanks for the response.

Roger - Was that enough info? I suppose I should have provided better pics of the key diagnostic parts.

Thanks!
Taxon
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Site Editor
Plano, TX

Posts: 1311
Taxon on Jun 17, 2015June 17th, 2015, 8:30 am EDT
Gary-

Roger - Was that enough info?


Sorry for the delay in responding. I also share your and Mark's belief that it's Acroneuria, for which the following species are present in Tennessee:

Acroneuria abnormis (Common Stone)
Acroneuria arida (Elegant Stone)
Acroneuria carolinensis (Carolina Stone)
Acroneuria covelli (no common name)
Acroneuria evoluta (Constricted Stone)
Acroneuria filicis (Illinois Stone)
Acroneuria frisoni (Central Stone)
Acroneuria lycorias (Boreal Stone)
Acroneuria perplexa (Enigmatic Stone)
Acroneuria petersi (Etowah Stone)
Best regards,
Roger Rohrbeck
www.FlyfishingEntomology.com
Oldredbarn
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Novi, MI

Posts: 2600
Oldredbarn on Jun 17, 2015June 17th, 2015, 9:50 am EDT
Acroneuria perplexa (Enigmatic Stone)


That is a great name for a bug! "perplexa".

Spence
"Even when my best efforts fail it's a satisfying challenge, and that, after all, is the essence of fly fishing." -Chauncy Lively

"Envy not the man who lives beside the river, but the man the river flows through." Joseph T Heywood

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