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Artistic view of a Male Pteronarcys californica (Pteronarcyidae) (Giant Salmonfly) Stonefly Adult from the Gallatin River in Montana
Salmonflies
Pteronarcys californica

The giant Salmonflies of the Western mountains are legendary for their proclivity to elicit consistent dry-fly action and ferocious strikes.

Dorsal view of a Neoleptophlebia (Leptophlebiidae) Mayfly Nymph from the Yakima River in Washington
Some characteristics from the microscope images for the tentative species id: The postero-lateral projections are found only on segment 9, not segment 8. Based on the key in Jacobus et al. (2014), it appears to key to Neoleptophlebia adoptiva or Neoleptophlebia heteronea, same as this specimen with pretty different abdominal markings. However, distinguishing between those calls for comparing the lengths of the second and third segment of the labial palp, and this one (like the other one) only seems to have two segments. So I'm stuck on them both. It's likely that the fact that they're immature nymphs stymies identification in some important way.
27" brown trout, my largest ever. It was the sub-dominant fish in its pool. After this, I hooked the bigger one, but I couldn't land it.
Troutnut is a project started in 2003 by salmonid ecologist Jason "Troutnut" Neuswanger to help anglers and fly tyers unabashedly embrace the entomological side of the sport. Learn more about Troutnut or support the project for an enhanced experience here.

Kroil
Coastal NJ

Posts: 34
Kroil on Feb 27, 2008February 27th, 2008, 12:04 pm EST
Guess these two bugs and the beverage brand and I will buy the winner a cold one on the banks of the lower East branch in May...
Here are your clues:






When I found the skull in the woods, the first thing I did was call the police. But then I got curious about it. I picked it up, and started wondering who this person was, and why he had deer horns. - Jack Handey

Troutnut
Troutnut's profile picture
Administrator
Bellevue, WA

Posts: 2758
Troutnut on Feb 27, 2008February 27th, 2008, 12:26 pm EST
That's kind of an easy one. :) But I'm in Alaska where I couldn't cash in on that cold one, so I'll let someone else answer.

Incidentally, I did catch a pretty 19-inch brown on the lower East Branch on a dry during that hatch last May.

Now if you want to really challenge people you can ask what that little dark-bodied bug is in the far upper right corner of that top picture.
Jason Neuswanger, Ph.D.
Troutnut and salmonid ecologist
Martinlf
Martinlf's profile picture
Moderator
Palmyra PA

Posts: 3047
Martinlf on Feb 27, 2008February 27th, 2008, 12:49 pm EST
Looks like Hennies and Buds to me. The little bug may be a midge. I need my flip focals.
"He spread them a yard and a half. 'And every one that got away is this big.'"

--Fred Chappell
Kroil
Coastal NJ

Posts: 34
Kroil on Feb 27, 2008February 27th, 2008, 1:16 pm EST
It is a very satisfying feeling to finally be surrounded by a few that actually walk the talk.

Troutnut, if you are here this spring let me know, I would like to buy you one anyway.
Martin, I am there ten weekends in the spring, and some weekdays, until the water temps tank. It would be my pleasure to sip one with you too. I have some great private accesses and would be happy to show you a few.
When I found the skull in the woods, the first thing I did was call the police. But then I got curious about it. I picked it up, and started wondering who this person was, and why he had deer horns. - Jack Handey

Kroil
Coastal NJ

Posts: 34
Kroil on Feb 27, 2008February 27th, 2008, 1:23 pm EST
PS
You both missed the other bug.

Look a little closer.
When I found the skull in the woods, the first thing I did was call the police. But then I got curious about it. I picked it up, and started wondering who this person was, and why he had deer horns. - Jack Handey

Troutnut
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Administrator
Bellevue, WA

Posts: 2758
Troutnut on Feb 27, 2008February 27th, 2008, 3:41 pm EST
It does depend on which way you look at it, but I think the one in the top right of the top pic looks like a mayfly dun, probably some sort of Baetid since it looks a little small for Paraleptophlebia at that time of year.

On closer inspection, the bottom mayfly on the beer can is probably Epeorus pleuralis. Clever how you hid him in plain sight. ;)

There are some more of the small mayflies on the water in the lower pictures, too.
Jason Neuswanger, Ph.D.
Troutnut and salmonid ecologist
Kroil
Coastal NJ

Posts: 34
Kroil on Feb 27, 2008February 27th, 2008, 11:26 pm EST
Correct Grasshopper. It amazes me at times how the simplest things can be right under your nose and go unnoticed. It was random luck that quill fly landed on the can but it made for a good picture. And yes, I did pack my cans out as always.
When I found the skull in the woods, the first thing I did was call the police. But then I got curious about it. I picked it up, and started wondering who this person was, and why he had deer horns. - Jack Handey

Martinlf
Martinlf's profile picture
Moderator
Palmyra PA

Posts: 3047
Martinlf on Feb 28, 2008February 28th, 2008, 10:21 am EST
OK, Kroil, no fair slipping a Gordon in with the Hennies and Buds. As for that little guy, we're talking about the one on the water, right? Upper right corner? OK, I'll bite; what is it? PM me if you want to keep the extra credit portion of the exam active.

As for fishing the East Branch I'd be very happy to join you if we can coordinate a time. I've only fished it twice, but caught my first Delaware brown there. I'll never forget that day!
"He spread them a yard and a half. 'And every one that got away is this big.'"

--Fred Chappell
Kroil
Coastal NJ

Posts: 34
Kroil on Feb 28, 2008February 28th, 2008, 10:25 am EST
Upper right corner?
Insectimus smallimus.
When I found the skull in the woods, the first thing I did was call the police. But then I got curious about it. I picked it up, and started wondering who this person was, and why he had deer horns. - Jack Handey

Martinlf
Martinlf's profile picture
Moderator
Palmyra PA

Posts: 3047
Martinlf on Feb 28, 2008February 28th, 2008, 12:57 pm EST
I thought so. But haven't they been reclassified as tinimus midgimatus?
"He spread them a yard and a half. 'And every one that got away is this big.'"

--Fred Chappell
Kinzua
W. PA

Posts: 20
Kinzua on Feb 28, 2008February 28th, 2008, 1:52 pm EST
The second photo looks like Hendrickson stew.

Ducfat
Posts: 10
Ducfat on Mar 7, 2008March 7th, 2008, 2:02 pm EST
The beer is bugweiser. The bugs are stoned flies!
Kroil
Coastal NJ

Posts: 34
Kroil on Mar 8, 2008March 8th, 2008, 12:11 am EST
Thats funny Ducfat. I'm gonna use that one in another post. Thanks.
When I found the skull in the woods, the first thing I did was call the police. But then I got curious about it. I picked it up, and started wondering who this person was, and why he had deer horns. - Jack Handey

Ducfat
Posts: 10
Ducfat on Mar 8, 2008March 8th, 2008, 1:24 pm EST
Anytime!

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