Header image
Enter a name
Artistic view of a Male Pteronarcys californica (Pteronarcyidae) (Giant Salmonfly) Stonefly Adult from the Gallatin River in Montana
Salmonflies
Pteronarcys californica

The giant Salmonflies of the Western mountains are legendary for their proclivity to elicit consistent dry-fly action and ferocious strikes.

Dorsal view of a Pycnopsyche guttifera (Limnephilidae) (Great Autumn Brown Sedge) Caddisfly Larva from the Yakima River in Washington
This specimen appears to be of the same species as this one collected in the same spot two months earlier. The identification of both is tentative. This one suffered some physical damage before being photographed, too, so the colors aren't totally natural. I was mostly photographing it to test out some new camera setting idea, which worked really well for a couple of closeups.
27" brown trout, my largest ever. It was the sub-dominant fish in its pool. After this, I hooked the bigger one, but I couldn't land it.
Troutnut is a project started in 2003 by salmonid ecologist Jason "Troutnut" Neuswanger to help anglers and fly tyers unabashedly embrace the entomological side of the sport. Learn more about Troutnut or support the project for an enhanced experience here.

Updates from April 18, 2006

Updates from April 18, 2006

Photos by Troutnut from Mongaup Creek in New York

Mongaup Creek in New York

Underwater photos by Troutnut from the East Branch of the Delaware River and Mongaup Creek in New York

I love this "above & below" landscape from a popular Catskill trout stream.  The picture is not doctored to show both perspectives.  Instead, my Pentax Optio WPi digital camera is able to take pictures with the tiny lens half-in, half-out of the water.

From the East Branch of the Delaware River in New York
Several Baetidae nymphs line up on a rock.

From Mongaup Creek in New York
This is a close-up underwater view of a stillborn Ephemerella subvaria (Henrickson) female dun.

From the East Branch of the Delaware River in New York
A Brachycentrus "Apple Caddis" pupa scoots around in the surface film.  Apparently it had some difficulty emerging, so I was able to slip my camera underneath it and take a picture from below.

From the East Branch of the Delaware River in New York
This picture from below shows a stillborn Ephemerella subvaria (Hendrickson) dun drifting on the surface amidst a number of shed pupal skins from Brachycentrus caddisflies which were heavily hatching that day.

From the East Branch of the Delaware River in New York
This Brachycentrus "Apple Caddis" struggled more than its kin in escaping its pupal skin, enabling me to take an underwater picture of it from directly below.  This is sort of a trout's eye view, but I used the flash for the picture so the transparent shuck appears far brighter than it really is.

From the East Branch of the Delaware River in New York
Mongaup Creek in New York
Mongaup Creek in New York
Mongaup Creek in New York

On-stream insect photos by Troutnut from Mongaup Creek in New York

Here's an above-the-water view of a stillborn Ephemerella subvaria dun which I also photographed from below the water.

From Mongaup Creek in New York

Closeup insects by Troutnut from the Beaverkill River and Mongaup Creek in New York

Quick Reply

Related Discussions

Topic
Replies
Last Reply
16
Aug 20, 2009
by Malcolm
9
Jun 28, 2007
by Troutnut
Troutnut.com is copyright © 2004-2024 (email Jason). privacy policy