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Lateral view of a Male Baetis (Baetidae) (Blue-Winged Olive) Mayfly Dun from Mystery Creek #43 in New York
Blue-winged Olives
Baetis

Tiny Baetis mayflies are perhaps the most commonly encountered and imitated by anglers on all American trout streams due to their great abundance, widespread distribution, and trout-friendly emergence habits.

Artistic view of a Perlodidae (Springflies and Yellow Stones) Stonefly Nymph from the Yakima River in Washington
This one seems to lead to Couplet 35 of the Key to Genera of Perlodidae Nymphs and the genus Isoperla, but I'm skeptical that's correct based on the general look. I need to get it under the microscope to review several choices in the key, and it'll probably end up a different Perlodidae.
27" brown trout, my largest ever. It was the sub-dominant fish in its pool. After this, I hooked the bigger one, but I couldn't land it.
Troutnut is a project started in 2003 by salmonid ecologist Jason "Troutnut" Neuswanger to help anglers and fly tyers unabashedly embrace the entomological side of the sport. Learn more about Troutnut or support the project for an enhanced experience here.

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Martinlf
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Palmyra PA

Posts: 3047
Martinlf on Sep 14, 2019September 14th, 2019, 4:35 pm EDT
Beautiful fish, Jason. That's a special place.
"He spread them a yard and a half. 'And every one that got away is this big.'"

--Fred Chappell
Wbranch
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York & Starlight PA

Posts: 2635
Wbranch on Sep 21, 2019September 21st, 2019, 6:38 pm EDT
Very interesting coloration on those brook trout. Is it because the water is stained? They have to be the darkest brookies I have ever seen. The little stream looks like an awesome place to fish. It appears to be quite deep for it's narrown width. Very cool.
Catskill fly fisher for fifty-five years.
Troutnut
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Bellevue, WA

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Troutnut on Sep 22, 2019September 22nd, 2019, 4:14 am EDT
The stained water is as good a guess as any for the coloration, but I don't know for sure.

This was my second time visiting this creek, which is apparently not on anyone's radar as a trout stream (except for being regulated as one), and I mostly wanted to investigate because it's a convenient drive. The first time I checked it out, in May many years ago, I saw no sign of trout. This time I walked in to a more promising stretch with more difficult access through an alder swamp. I caught four very nice brookies in about 20 yards of creek.

What looks on Google Earth like a grassy meadow is actually giant tussucks around 7 feet tall at this time of year, and the gaps between tussocks were mostly flooded after a week with lots of rain. I didn't dare step down into the creek, because I couldn't see very far into it, the bottom seemed silty, and it was clearly fairly deep in most places. It was all I could do to flatten enough grass in a couple places to make some short casts, and I caught the fish there.

I tried to continue up the bank, but the swamp just got sketchier with a deep, muddy old oxbow channel blocking my way. This would be a good one to explore with a partner, ideally much earlier in the year when the grass is shorter and the water is lower. With mere knee-high grass and dry ground between the tussocks, it could be a lot of fun.
Jason Neuswanger, Ph.D.
Troutnut and salmonid ecologist
Wbranch
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York & Starlight PA

Posts: 2635
Wbranch on Sep 28, 2019September 28th, 2019, 4:13 am EDT
Jason,

I didn't dare step down into the creek, because I couldn't see very far into it, the bottom seemed silty


That was wise of you not to step into the unknown. A few years ago in Spring Creek near Bellefonte, PA I was wading alone, as I always do, and came upon a mucky section. I wanted to fish above it and didn't want to bushwhack around the mucky area. It was a foolish move - as I stepped into it both legs sunk deep into thick mud over my knees. I couldn't lift a leg out to make another step. I was pretty much totally stuck. Luckily though I was just a foot or so from the bank and some willows with strong branches. I put my rod down on the bank and grabbed the thickest branch I could and pulled as much as I could to get one leg out and then the other. I was successful but shaken up by the experience. I had my cell phone and there is good service there and my next move would of been to call 911 to help rescue me.
Catskill fly fisher for fifty-five years.
Martinlf
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Palmyra PA

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Martinlf on Sep 30, 2019September 30th, 2019, 2:26 pm EDT
Matt, something similar happened to me on Big Spring years ago. It is scary. I almost lost a boot that day.
"He spread them a yard and a half. 'And every one that got away is this big.'"

--Fred Chappell

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