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Lateral view of a Male Baetis (Baetidae) (Blue-Winged Olive) Mayfly Dun from Mystery Creek #43 in New York
Blue-winged Olives
Baetis

Tiny Baetis mayflies are perhaps the most commonly encountered and imitated by anglers on all American trout streams due to their great abundance, widespread distribution, and trout-friendly emergence habits.

Dorsal view of a Ephemerella mucronata (Ephemerellidae) Mayfly Nymph from the Yakima River in Washington
This is an interesting one. Following the keys in Merritt R.W., Cummins, K.W., and Berg, M.B. (2019) and Jacobus et al. (2014), it keys clearly to Ephemerella. Jacobus et al provide a key to species, but some of the characteristics are tricky to interpret without illustrations. If I didn't make any mistakes, this one keys to Ephemerella mucronata, which has not previously been reported any closer to here than Montana and Alberta. The main character seems to fit well: "Abdominal terga with prominent, paired, subparallel, spiculate ridges." Several illustrations or descriptions of this holarctic species from the US and Europe seem to match, including the body length, tarsal claws and denticles, labial palp, and gill shapes. These sources include including Richard Allen's original description of this species in North America under the now-defunct name E. moffatae in Allen RK (1977) and the figures in this description of the species in Italy.
27" brown trout, my largest ever. It was the sub-dominant fish in its pool. After this, I hooked the bigger one, but I couldn't land it.
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Lam
Lancaster, PA

Posts: 81
Lam on Apr 22, 2019April 22nd, 2019, 6:28 am EDT
According to hatch charts online, sulphurs won't be hatching until early May, the consensus is between the 8th and 12th. Having said that, and add to it several days in the 70's and mid to high 60's, is it possible that I am seeing some now? I noticed what I think are sulphurs on a stream that has a very strong and long sulphur hatch. Others are telling me I'm crazy and some others have seen them too. Some people tell me that they could be light hendricksons but they are fairly small, size 16ish and I don't believe this stream has a praticularly strong handrickson hatch.
Lam
Lancaster, PA

Posts: 81
Lam on Apr 22, 2019April 22nd, 2019, 6:28 am EDT
I'm in south central PA.
RleeP
NW PA - Pennsylvania's Glacial Pothole Wonderland

Posts: 398
RleeP on Apr 22, 2019April 22nd, 2019, 7:08 am EDT
I'm far from the world's most observant hatch follower, but sure, it is possible and even likely you are beginning to see sulfurs about now, especially if the streams you are looking for them on are limestone or thusly influenced. They usually start showing up on Spring Creek in central PA the last 10 days or so of April, maybe a bit earlier in some years. On freestones, especially smaller to medium mountain freestones in the northern half of the state they are usually a coupe weeks behind the limestones and won't start in earnest until sometime in May, usually around the 10th or so.

But even on freestones in southern PA, they may well be kicking in about now or very soon. One of the manifestations, most likely of how the climate is gradually changing making many of the hatches begin earlier.
Crepuscular
Crepuscular's profile picture
Boiling Springs, PA

Posts: 920
Crepuscular on Apr 24, 2019April 24th, 2019, 12:43 am EDT
According to hatch charts online, sulphurs won't be hatching until early May, the consensus is between the 8th and 12th. Having said that, and add to it several days in the 70's and mid to high 60's, is it possible that I am seeing some now? I noticed what I think are sulphurs on a stream that has a very strong and long sulphur hatch. Others are telling me I'm crazy and some others have seen them too. Some people tell me that they could be light hendricksons but they are fairly small, size 16ish and I don't believe this stream has a praticularly strong handrickson hatch.


I've seen sulphurs on Donegal in April. Also if it is on a limestone system that you are seeing sulphurs, there are some that will have E. invaria emergences throughout the year.
Wbranch
Wbranch's profile picture
York & Starlight PA

Posts: 2635
Wbranch on Apr 26, 2019April 26th, 2019, 10:59 am EDT
Lam wrote;

Having said that, and add to it several days in the 70's and mid to high 60's, is it possible that I am seeing some now?


No, it is extremely unlikely you have seen any sulfurs in SE PA. Neither Ep dorothea or Ep invaria (which is larger, about a #14, and earlier than dorothea) Post up a picture and I'm sure some of the sites entomologists will be able to tell you what it is.
Catskill fly fisher for fifty-five years.
Wbranch
Wbranch's profile picture
York & Starlight PA

Posts: 2635
Wbranch on Apr 26, 2019April 26th, 2019, 11:02 am EDT
Since Crepuscular is far more knowledgeable about SE PA spring creeks than I am I would defer to his stream knowledge and wisdom well above my lesser knowledge. I fish far more in the western Catskills than the SE PA waters.
Catskill fly fisher for fifty-five years.
Martinlf
Martinlf's profile picture
Moderator
Palmyra PA

Posts: 3047
Martinlf on Apr 28, 2019April 28th, 2019, 10:12 am EDT
there are some that will have E. invaria emergences throughout the year.


i.e. even in the winter! Hard to believe, but true.
"He spread them a yard and a half. 'And every one that got away is this big.'"

--Fred Chappell

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