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Lateral view of a Male Baetis (Baetidae) (Blue-Winged Olive) Mayfly Dun from Mystery Creek #43 in New York
Blue-winged Olives
Baetis

Tiny Baetis mayflies are perhaps the most commonly encountered and imitated by anglers on all American trout streams due to their great abundance, widespread distribution, and trout-friendly emergence habits.

Lateral view of a Onocosmoecus (Limnephilidae) (Great Late-Summer Sedge) Caddisfly Larva from the Yakima River in Washington
This specimen keys pretty easily to Onocosmoecus, and it closely resembles a specimen from Alaska which caddis expert Dave Ruiter recognized as this genus. As with that specimen, the only species in the genus documented in this area is Onocosmoecus unicolor, but Dave suggested for that specimen that there might be multiple not-yet-distinguished species under the unicolor umbrella and it would be best to stick with the genus-level ID. I'm doing the same for this one.
27" brown trout, my largest ever. It was the sub-dominant fish in its pool. After this, I hooked the bigger one, but I couldn't land it.
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Wbranch
Wbranch's profile picture
York & Starlight PA

Posts: 2635
Wbranch on Aug 20, 2007August 20th, 2007, 12:55 am EDT

Catskill fly fisher for fifty-five years.
Softhackle
Softhackle's profile picture
Wellsville, NY

Posts: 540
Softhackle on Aug 20, 2007August 20th, 2007, 8:49 am EDT
I've not done any studies, but I see a difference in the way a fly sits on the water. I can tell that splaying the tail helps it to sit upright, better. It stabilizes the fly, even in the classic Catskill design flies.(I will note, here that if you do splay the tails on a Catskill design fly, it may, buy some, no longer be considered "Catskill style". I will also note I consider the term "Catskill Style" inaccurate.) I also feel specific designs of flies must have, at least, splayed tails in order to perform as designed.

Mark
"I have the highest respect for the skilled wet-fly fisherman, as he has mastered an art of very great difficulty." Edward R. Hewitt

Flymphs, Soft-hackles and Spiders: http://www.troutnut.com/libstudio/FS&S/index.html
Wbranch
Wbranch's profile picture
York & Starlight PA

Posts: 2635
Wbranch on Aug 20, 2007August 20th, 2007, 10:11 am EDT
Catskill fly fisher for fifty-five years.
Softhackle
Softhackle's profile picture
Wellsville, NY

Posts: 540
Softhackle on Aug 20, 2007August 20th, 2007, 11:45 am EDT
Hi Wbranch,
I agree with you and say that's a very good description. I have had some very involved discussions regarding "the Catskill Style". I know a few very educated fly fishers/tiers that disagree that this "style" even exists. With me, however, It is somewhat a matter of semantics. I prefer "Catskill Design" rather than "style". To me, style is something akin to a fad or particular embellishment or something very fleeting and unlasting-transient. A design is something more lasting and functional.


Mark
"I have the highest respect for the skilled wet-fly fisherman, as he has mastered an art of very great difficulty." Edward R. Hewitt

Flymphs, Soft-hackles and Spiders: http://www.troutnut.com/libstudio/FS&S/index.html
Wbranch
Wbranch's profile picture
York & Starlight PA

Posts: 2635
Wbranch on Aug 20, 2007August 20th, 2007, 3:40 pm EDT
Catskill fly fisher for fifty-five years.
Softhackle
Softhackle's profile picture
Wellsville, NY

Posts: 540
Softhackle on Aug 21, 2007August 21st, 2007, 1:56 am EDT
Wbranch,
Their flies would definitely fit into the "Catskill Design" category, but you have to realize that their flies were based on flies designed by tiers that came before them like Rube Cross, who was the first commercial tier in the Catskills and who, along with Roy Steenrod and Herman Christian , set the standard for Catskill flies. These gentlemen were students of Theodore Gordon. many of Gordon's flies were based on flies created in England, which is why some tiers will argue that there really is no "Catskill Style or Design".

Mark
"I have the highest respect for the skilled wet-fly fisherman, as he has mastered an art of very great difficulty." Edward R. Hewitt

Flymphs, Soft-hackles and Spiders: http://www.troutnut.com/libstudio/FS&S/index.html
Troutbum13
Millerton,PA

Posts: 7
Troutbum13 on Sep 5, 2008September 5th, 2008, 9:22 am EDT
Actually, Rube Cross was not the first commercial tyer in the Catskills. It was George W. Cooper. It was in the 1870s when he was tying flies for sale.
Leakywaders
New England

Posts: 43
Leakywaders on Sep 7, 2008September 7th, 2008, 9:42 am EDT
The "NEARNUF" (HG Tapley) uses a pair of split feather quills for tail, that way the fly is stablized, rides upright, etc.
On the other hand, if the fly falls over it looks like a stillborn, or cripple, and may get more strikes. I think tha would be a "good mistake" Maybe it is becouse our flies are such poor imitations, that they are successful. i,e, the hook looks like a trailing shuck. The wing that goes cockeyed on the first cast, then catches fish, etc.
Drag free??? If the fly didn't drag, I wouldn't know where it was!!

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