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Lateral view of a Female Hexagenia limbata (Ephemeridae) (Hex) Mayfly Dun from the Namekagon River in Wisconsin
Hex Mayflies
Hexagenia limbata

The famous nocturnal Hex hatch of the Midwest (and a few other lucky locations) stirs to the surface mythically large brown trout that only touch streamers for the rest of the year.

Dorsal view of a Ephemerella mucronata (Ephemerellidae) Mayfly Nymph from the Yakima River in Washington
This is an interesting one. Following the keys in Merritt R.W., Cummins, K.W., and Berg, M.B. (2019) and Jacobus et al. (2014), it keys clearly to Ephemerella. Jacobus et al provide a key to species, but some of the characteristics are tricky to interpret without illustrations. If I didn't make any mistakes, this one keys to Ephemerella mucronata, which has not previously been reported any closer to here than Montana and Alberta. The main character seems to fit well: "Abdominal terga with prominent, paired, subparallel, spiculate ridges." Several illustrations or descriptions of this holarctic species from the US and Europe seem to match, including the body length, tarsal claws and denticles, labial palp, and gill shapes. These sources include including Richard Allen's original description of this species in North America under the now-defunct name E. moffatae in Allen RK (1977) and the figures in this description of the species in Italy.
27" brown trout, my largest ever. It was the sub-dominant fish in its pool. After this, I hooked the bigger one, but I couldn't land it.
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Barbaube
Barbaube's profile picture
France

Posts: 9
Barbaube on Nov 22, 2018November 22nd, 2018, 4:36 am EST
Hi Everyone and Happy Thanksgiving,

Christmas is coming and I am thinking about getting a new stick. I love to hike to high mountain lakes where I fish from the banks. But I often find myself limited distance wise with my 9ft 6wt Orvis Recon (which is excellent for streamers in rivers by the way). I would also like a rod that will handle quicker sinking lines better. Since I already have a 6wt I was thinking about getting a 10ft 8wt that I could also use for sea run brown trouts (our European steelheads). But from what I heard 8wt is way too big for trouts...and yeah most fish are small in these lakes but there are some big browns, above 23 inch.

Will I gain significant distance with a longer 8wt rod? Will it spook the fish? I thought about getting a longer 6wt or 7wt, but I feel like it won't be much different from what I have now.

I'm even considering getting a 4wt or 6wt switch rod to reach farther... but I have never fished on.


Let me know what you think!
Iasgair
Iasgair's profile picture
Colorado

Posts: 148
Iasgair on Nov 26, 2018November 26th, 2018, 5:13 am EST
As for switch rods, I can't help there. But since you want to use fast sinking lines, yes, by all means an 8 weight rod would be my choice.

As for a longer rod casting farther, it will, but it depends on what your definition of what a significant distance is. It depends really how good of a caster you are in the first place, but if you're thinking it will get you out 25 or 30 more feet, no, it won't. But yes, it will cast a little farther. Question is, is it needed? Only you can answer that.

I have a 1004/4 and I find it doesn't spook fish at all. Just think about how many European nymphing rods are being used these days and no one I have heard is having issues of spooking fish.

So Barbaube, if you want a longer 8wt rod, I say get one.

I have the Orvis Recon that's a 9'6" 6wt, and I agree, they are great for streamers. But a 10' 8wt rod, wow, that would be a beast. You'd be able to catch some big pike with that rod if you wanted. The wind itself would stop blowing just from intimidation.

Many say that a longer rod, for example my 10' 4wt is actually more like a 5wt when it comes to 10' rods. Could explain why you see so many 10' 3wts on the market because they are more like 4wts. My rod does seem like a 5wt probably due to the longer lower section, making it a bit stronger of a rod.
Wbranch
Wbranch's profile picture
York & Starlight PA

Posts: 2635
Wbranch on Nov 26, 2018November 26th, 2018, 10:03 am EST
Iasgair wrote;

Many say that a longer rod, for example my 10' 4wt is actually more like a 5wt when it comes to 10' rods. Could explain why you see so many 10' 3wts on the market because they are more like 4wts.


I'm reading this, and not being disparaging to the author, but it makes little sense. If you want a rod to be more like such and such rod then buy the rod and be done with it. Why burden yourself with 12" more rod length to travel with and carry around with you all day when maybe you really want the one line weight heavier rod.

I have at least three each of #4, #5, #6, two #7, three #8. I don't have to wonder if a rod is more like this or that rod. I do have a 10' 6" #6 switch rod and it doesn't feel like anything other than a #6 line weight. I could easily throw a #7 line with it if I wanted but I have a 9' #7 that performs wonderfully. I do have a 10' #7 3 pc rod I use for steelhead and like it because it is easier to throw big upstream mends and I can roll cast an indicator, a couple BB's, and two flies 45 feet with just one flip.

Buy a rod for a specific purpose if you can afford it. Buy a lot of rods if you are able to. Then you won't be wanting one rod to do the work of another. If you can't afford a stable of rods then buy 3-4 to use specifically for the species you target the most.
Catskill fly fisher for fifty-five years.
Iasgair
Iasgair's profile picture
Colorado

Posts: 148
Iasgair on Nov 26, 2018November 26th, 2018, 1:29 pm EST
Iasgair wrote;

Many say that a longer rod, for example my 10' 4wt is actually more like a 5wt when it comes to 10' rods. Could explain why you see so many 10' 3wts on the market because they are more like 4wts.


I'm reading this, and not being disparaging to the author, but it makes little sense. If you want a rod to be more like such and such rod then buy the rod and be done with it. Why burden yourself with 12" more rod length to travel with and carry around with you all day when maybe you really want the one line weight heavier rod.

I have at least three each of #4, #5, #6, two #7, three #8. I don't have to wonder if a rod is more like this or that rod. I do have a 10' 6" #6 switch rod and it doesn't feel like anything other than a #6 line weight. I could easily throw a #7 line with it if I wanted but I have a 9' #7 that performs wonderfully. I do have a 10' #7 3 pc rod I use for steelhead and like it because it is easier to throw big upstream mends and I can roll cast an indicator, a couple BB's, and two flies 45 feet with just one flip.

Buy a rod for a specific purpose if you can afford it. Buy a lot of rods if you are able to. Then you won't be wanting one rod to do the work of another. If you can't afford a stable of rods then buy 3-4 to use specifically for the species you target the most.[/quote


i bought the rod back when i used to czech nymph. my intention was to buy a 1004 rod, and that's what i got. i don't build the rods, but if the butt section seems stronger than a 9' 4wt, that's fine with me, and i have five 4wt rods with different actions. the tip is soft to prevent braking the tippet, and the butt section gives me the power i need to do whatever i need it to do. works beautifully for what it's intended purpose, and more.

it'll throw a 5wt line true taper just wonderfully, but it throws a 4wt line just like it was designed for. i'd say it's like a heavy 4.5wt rod if that makes sense. but it's the middle section to the tip is where it performs like a 4wt.

the best example i can give is when i fish the white river, i normally fish a 9' 5wt rod. a 8'6" or 9' 4wt medium fast rod with the current and size of fish in that river can make you feel under-gunned real quick. but for some reason, my 1004 on that river does very well. why? it just handles everything better than all my other 4wts on that river.

it's not that i "want" the rod to be like such and such rod as you put it, it just is. and i enjoy it as much as all my other rods. is it a 5wt in reality? heck if i know, or care. it just does what i bought it for very well.

but....your last comment about buying rods for specific purposes, i absolutely 100% agree with you, and i do buy rods that way.
Jawyellowba
Jawyellowba's profile picture
Posts: 6
Jawyellowba on Feb 11, 2019February 11th, 2019, 7:59 pm EST
The rod I use most for streamer fishing for trout is a 9' 6wt Orvis Recon. When I want something bigger it is a 9' 8wt TFO BVK. After selling my switch rod recently I have thought about getting a 9'6" or 10' 6wt or 7wt but i have not decided what I want or if I really want it.

Regards,

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