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Lateral view of a Female Hexagenia limbata (Ephemeridae) (Hex) Mayfly Dun from the Namekagon River in Wisconsin
Hex Mayflies
Hexagenia limbata

The famous nocturnal Hex hatch of the Midwest (and a few other lucky locations) stirs to the surface mythically large brown trout that only touch streamers for the rest of the year.

Dorsal view of a Skwala (Perlodidae) (Large Springfly) Stonefly Nymph from the Yakima River in Washington
This Skwala nymph still has a couple months left to go before hatching, but it's still a good representative of its species, which was extremely abundant in my sample for a stonefly of this size. It's obvious why the Yakima is known for its Skwala hatch.
27" brown trout, my largest ever. It was the sub-dominant fish in its pool. After this, I hooked the bigger one, but I couldn't land it.
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Lateral view of a Male Baetis (Baetidae) (Blue-Winged Olive) Mayfly Dun from Mystery Creek #43 in New York
This dun molted most of the way into a spinner (though the wings got stuck) the evening after I photographed it, so I took some more photos of the spinner.

I found a female nearby, probably of the same species.
Martinlf
Martinlf's profile picture
Moderator
Palmyra PA

Posts: 3047
Martinlf on Jan 30, 2016January 30th, 2016, 8:27 am EST
So, in about a month olives will be hatching heavily in Central PA. Does anyone have a favorite pattern or secret weapon? Mine is a klinkhamer style emerger tied to match the natural, with a white or orange post for those slate grey days when I can't see anything on the water. If the fish seem picky, I'll go to a dun post, though.
"He spread them a yard and a half. 'And every one that got away is this big.'"

--Fred Chappell
PaulRoberts
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Colorado

Posts: 1776
PaulRoberts on Jan 30, 2016January 30th, 2016, 9:52 am EST
I use a Comparadun and a CDC parachute for the unsophisticated little trout I now fish for, although "sophistication" is often associated with water type. Some flatwater stretches and pools I fish can be challenging.
Martinlf
Martinlf's profile picture
Moderator
Palmyra PA

Posts: 3047
Martinlf on Jan 30, 2016January 30th, 2016, 4:51 pm EST
Paul, how do you tie your CDC parachute? Do you use the CDC for hackle, like Shane Stalcup and Ed Engle do? I've tied a few of these, and like the design. I've become a fan of CDC comparaduns of late, having them work very well a time or two.
"He spread them a yard and a half. 'And every one that got away is this big.'"

--Fred Chappell
PaulRoberts
PaulRoberts's profile picture
Colorado

Posts: 1776
PaulRoberts on Jan 31, 2016January 31st, 2016, 4:16 am EST
No, CDC for the post. And regular deer hair Comparaduns. I also fish mergers of rabbit foot hairs (akin to the Usual) and goose "downy barbs" used as a dubbing ball, and an indicator hackled fly too. All are pretty standard designs nowadays.

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