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Lateral view of a Male Baetis (Baetidae) (Blue-Winged Olive) Mayfly Dun from Mystery Creek #43 in New York
Blue-winged Olives
Baetis

Tiny Baetis mayflies are perhaps the most commonly encountered and imitated by anglers on all American trout streams due to their great abundance, widespread distribution, and trout-friendly emergence habits.

Dorsal view of a Epeorus albertae (Heptageniidae) (Pink Lady) Mayfly Nymph from the East Fork Issaquah Creek in Washington
This specimen keys to the Epeorus albertae group of species. Of the five species in that group, the two known in Washington state are Epeorus albertae and Epeorus dulciana. Of the two, albertae has been collected in vastly more locations in Washington than dulciana, suggesting it is far more common. On that basis alone I'm tentatively putting this nymph in albertae, with the large caveat that there's no real information to rule out dulciana.
27" brown trout, my largest ever. It was the sub-dominant fish in its pool. After this, I hooked the bigger one, but I couldn't land it.
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Millcreek has attached these 7 pictures to aid in identification. The message is below.
Intermediate instar. Approximately 10 mm. case length.
Intermediate instar. Approximately 10 mm. case length.
Late instars. Approximately 20 mm.
Late instar. Approximately 20 mm.
Side sclerites. One way to distinguish from other species.
Case. Late instar. Approximately 20 mm.
Case. Late instar. Approximately 20 mm.
Millcreek
Healdsburg, CA

Posts: 344
Millcreek on Mar 23, 2015March 23rd, 2015, 3:57 pm EDT
These larvae are found in slack water and pools in Mill Creek (tributary to the Russian River). They begin to show around March and are pretty much gone by September. The cases change from small ones with redwood or Douglas fir needles to larger ones incorporating pieces of bark, small pieces of gravel and relatively large sticks.
"If we knew what it was we were doing, it would not be called research, would it?"
-Albert Einstein
Creno
Grants Pass, OR

Posts: 302
Creno on Mar 23, 2015March 23rd, 2015, 6:09 pm EDT
looks like at least two species there - the one at the top has banded legs. There are lots of species that are quite difficult to separate. It is likely that many records have been mis-determined. Most species don't have adequately described larvae.
Millcreek
Healdsburg, CA

Posts: 344
Millcreek on Mar 23, 2015March 23rd, 2015, 6:59 pm EDT
Yeah, the one at the top apparently is different. It would be interesting to
see if they change as they get older. Other than the banded legs they appear quite similar.
"If we knew what it was we were doing, it would not be called research, would it?"
-Albert Einstein
Creno
Grants Pass, OR

Posts: 302
Creno on Mar 23, 2015March 23rd, 2015, 8:08 pm EDT
I don't think things like leg banding coloration will change. The color patterns should get more distinct with later instars. Most changes will occur with the addition/size of secondary setae/gills with later instars.
Millcreek
Healdsburg, CA

Posts: 344
Millcreek on Mar 23, 2015March 23rd, 2015, 8:39 pm EDT
Interesting. I'm going to have to go back to my vials and see if I can find some with banded legs as later instars. Also see if other changes occur. I'll keep you posted.
"If we knew what it was we were doing, it would not be called research, would it?"
-Albert Einstein
Crepuscular
Crepuscular's profile picture
Boiling Springs, PA

Posts: 920
Crepuscular on Mar 24, 2015March 24th, 2015, 2:41 am EDT
nice
Millcreek
Healdsburg, CA

Posts: 344
Millcreek on Mar 24, 2015March 24th, 2015, 8:38 am EDT
I went back and looked through my vials. Found the original one with banded legs. It was the only one out of about 70 with banded legs. Either an aberration or another species. The others of that age range were quite close in appearance except for the legs.
"If we knew what it was we were doing, it would not be called research, would it?"
-Albert Einstein
PaulRoberts
PaulRoberts's profile picture
Colorado

Posts: 1776
PaulRoberts on Mar 24, 2015March 24th, 2015, 4:34 pm EDT
The "non-mammalian protrooberances" are different too. The dorsal hump on the first is nearly a spike. Nifty.
Millcreek
Healdsburg, CA

Posts: 344
Millcreek on Mar 24, 2015March 24th, 2015, 7:37 pm EDT
The "non-mammalian protrooberances" are different too. The dorsal hump on the first is nearly a spike.


The "protooberances" are the same on all early instars. They get blunter as the larva matures.
"If we knew what it was we were doing, it would not be called research, would it?"
-Albert Einstein
Creno
Grants Pass, OR

Posts: 302
Creno on Mar 25, 2015March 25th, 2015, 11:07 am EDT
The spacing humps of the 1st abdominal segment ("non-mammalian protrooberances" thought to be useful in respiration) are highly flexible, muscled, and, when viewed closely, have many small scales, setae, etc. They are retractile/extensile and, as such,the shape would be expected to be highly variable within both live and preserved material. I am not aware of the actual shape of the spacing humps having been used for taxonomic significance although their presence/absence, setation, scleritization, etc. is often used.
Jmd123
Jmd123's profile picture
Oscoda, MI

Posts: 2474
Jmd123 on Mar 25, 2015March 25th, 2015, 7:45 pm EDT
"non-mammalian protrooberances"

OK guys, I jut have to laugh...does this remind anyone else of Frank Zappa??? LOL seriously!!!

;oD

Jonathon
No matter how big the one you just caught is, there's always a bigger one out there somewhere...

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